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Old 09-08-2014, 12:16 PM   #21
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We've been having a lot of furries lately. Today I found some tent caterpillars on a mulberry tree that I'll try to ID later. My children are so tired of me getting excited about bugs, yet I called them over anyway. Oh! they thought they were the neatest things and laughed at how they jerked around while working. That was their comment. Some were eating and others were "working". LOL They were curious about the webbing. I think I read that it protects them from most predators as they really do not want to break through that mess. I've heard North American Cuckoos do eat this type of caterpillar.
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Old 09-08-2014, 12:24 PM   #22
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BB, check this out.

Oriole, eating tent caterpillars! - Ohio Birds and Biodiversity
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Old 09-08-2014, 02:15 PM   #23
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That's neat that your kids enjoyed the caterpillars BB
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Old 09-10-2014, 05:57 PM   #24
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That was neat rockerBOO! That is ingenious how the orioles figured how to bypass the pricklies. Our Baltimores just left, otherwise they'd have a good food source. I wonder if yesterday's rains did the tentworms in. I checked on them today and there was no movement, even when I touched some of the webbing. Maybe they were sleeping??

My children surprise me sometimes. They act all grossed out when I talk about bugs, but yet I know they find them just as fascinating.

Here are some interesting bugs I found recently.

#1. I cannot get this narrowed down, other than I do not think it is a beetle. I see its long orange tongue when it feeds on the blazingstar.

#2. Black beetles?? I am not sure there is enough to identify this to anything specific.

#3. Is this a Soldier beetle? The guide mentions look-alikes, but I cannot figure out what those are. They like the Goldenrod, too.
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I'm Going to Bug You :)-flyingbug.jpg   I'm Going to Bug You :)-blackthings.jpg   I'm Going to Bug You :)-soldier.jpg  
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Old 09-10-2014, 07:32 PM   #25
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cool pictures BB. The third one reminds me of a lightening bug and that reminds me that they are gone for this season. I guess your camera is still working.
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Old 09-15-2014, 11:03 AM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Birding Bunch View Post
That was neat rockerBOO! That is ingenious how the orioles figured how to bypass the pricklies. Our Baltimores just left, otherwise they'd have a good food source. I wonder if yesterday's rains did the tentworms in. I checked on them today and there was no movement, even when I touched some of the webbing. Maybe they were sleeping??

My children surprise me sometimes. They act all grossed out when I talk about bugs, but yet I know they find them just as fascinating.

Here are some interesting bugs I found recently.

#1. I cannot get this narrowed down, other than I do not think it is a beetle. I see its long orange tongue when it feeds on the blazingstar.

#2. Black beetles?? I am not sure there is enough to identify this to anything specific.

#3. Is this a Soldier beetle? The guide mentions look-alikes, but I cannot figure out what those are. They like the Goldenrod, too.
#1 Looks like a yellow collared Scape moth
#2 Looks like a Blister-oil beetle Epicauta pennsylvanica - Black blister beetle -- Discover Life
#3 It appears to be the soldier beetle. The look a like... Chauliognathus marginatus Margined Leatherwing - Chauliognathus marginatus - BugGuide.Net has the more longer than wide Pronotum area. Discover Life
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Old 09-17-2014, 06:30 PM   #27
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Thank you for the IDs, havalotta. I just could not get anywhere with the first two.

Ellen, these pictures were taken before I left the camera out in the rain. It was still drying out when I posted this. But thankfully, the camera does still work, at least as well as this photographer.

My oldest son just came in with the sourest expression on his face. He was stung by a wasp while cutting down weed trees. He said, "I think it was a native".
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Old 09-17-2014, 08:26 PM   #28
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Oh your poor son BB. That hurts. It's cute what he said.
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Old 09-19-2014, 08:52 AM   #29
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This son of mine is so anti-dramatic about things, so he was just hysterical. He is taller than me, a big lumbering beast because he doesn't like being so tall. After he told me, he tromped off to hide behind a book for awhile.

To help him with the sting, after ice and trying lavender essential oil, I made a mix of charcoal taken out of capsules with a little water (I did not have the recommended essential oil) and put that on the area. Prior to putting it on, the spot was red and inflamed. Looked nasty and painful. I wrapped the poultice in gauze.

I was concerned he'd have a bad reaction overnight, since the Nutritional Healing book said it could be instant or several hours later. We are so grateful!!, he was fine. The next morning, after taking off the gauze and cleaning it, all that was red was the stinger site. No pain or anything.
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Old 09-19-2014, 01:12 PM   #30
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I am going kind of crazy right now. My husband is sanding the dining room floor. I knew this was not going to be pleasant. First the noise and smell, then the smell of the finish. I really needed it, so I am trying not to complain.

Earlier, I went outside to commit finger murder on those blasted corn rootworm adults. Sadly, the next generation has already been laid for next year's corn crops. Well, in my squishing, I noticed a plain brown slug on one of the rose mallows. I don't see many of those, so I left it alone to do what slugs do.
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