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Old 07-16-2014, 07:05 PM   #11
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#1.Here is a spider residing outside my kitchen window. It was winding webbing around the beetle or whatever it is.

I have stopped cleaning the outside of my windows to slow down on bird strikes (window tape is on some windows), but spiders make another fine excuse. I usually have one species or another that likes spending time in that spot.

#2. Some type of beetle on my Maximilian Sunflower. I could not tell if it eats the plant or something on the plant. And my Maximilian is exploding! I planted bare roots in May and I highly anticipate lots of flowers.

#3. I found this in my bug guide, so I do not need an ID. It is sad that a bee so pretty doesn't have a common name, just a Latin name. It was listed on the same page as the Sweat Bees but was not named as such. And who came up with Sweat Bee? They are pretty in their own right.

I am not sure I will ever get as good as you all here, but it is fun trying to figure out the names of all the critters we have on our property. I wish the children held the same interest. They think I am nuts.
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Old 07-17-2014, 06:42 PM   #12
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Depending on size, the orange and black beetle is probably a milkweed beetle,
Species Labidomera clivicollis - Swamp Milkweed Leaf Beetle - BugGuide.Net

The spider image isn't clear enough to identify.

Sweat bees are named because they come for salt, and are attracted to sweaty skin. Most iridescent green bees are sweat bees.

Kaufman's Field Guide to Insects of North America is a good reference for identifying your insects. I find it the easiest of the guides I have to use, and if it doesn't have the specific insect, it gets me close enough to make it easier to find it on bugguide.
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Old 07-18-2014, 12:50 PM   #13
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I have this orange and black bug on my milkweed.

Species Oncopeltus fasciatus - Large Milkweed Bug - BugGuide.Net
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Old 07-18-2014, 05:43 PM   #14
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Thank you so much for looking at my bugs.

The beetle was small if I remember. I thought birds were hard to photograph, but trying to get small things is more of a challenge.

I do have the Kaufman guide and it is handy, and I've figured out a few things.
Here are some more.

1. This is one I think I figured out... an Ambush Bug. I was just about to pull this Queen Anne's Lace when I found it. I still later pulled, but gently.

2 and 3. A tiny little hopper. Maybe at most a half-inch from head to tail. And if it can be ID'ed, is the red spot a baby or a parasite? Or maybe something strange pooped on it?

4. Another beetle. I think it was on the Maximilian, too. I tried getting the face. It looks different from the Swamp Milkwwed Leaf Beetle.

5. Another hopper. I was with a child picking up rocks and he was about to pick this up and got a little bit of a startle.
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I'm Going to Bug You :)-ambush.jpg   I'm Going to Bug You :)-redspot.jpg   I'm Going to Bug You :)-redspotbug.jpg   I'm Going to Bug You :)-teenybeetle.jpg   I'm Going to Bug You :)-rockhopper.jpg  

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Old 07-18-2014, 06:41 PM   #15
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Another bug... I thought I might as well, since I am editing photos right now. This was at max. an inch long. I am terrible at eyeballing measurements. The leaf on the left is yellow sweet clover. I was yanking up weeds around the Maximilian. Is this a larvae of the Gypsy Moth?
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Old 07-30-2014, 07:57 PM   #16
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Well, your "rockhopper" is a grasshopper nymph. Note the stubs that will become wings in future instars. Grasshoppers go through incomplete metamorphosis, generally going through five instars from hatching to their final adult phase and only get wings when they are adults.

Your "red spotted" bug is some kind of planthopper, probably the nymph of a planthopper since it doesn't look fully formed. I have no idea on the red spot other than it looks extrinsic, ie on the insect rather than of the insect.

I like your Ambush Bug. He is cool. I admit to leaving Queen Anne's Lace since mine usually gets stripped bare by black ST caterpillars by the end of the summer.

What is a Maximillian?

How teeny is teeny on your black and orange beetle? Compared to a ladybug, is it much smaller or about the same size?
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Old 07-31-2014, 09:30 AM   #17
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Thank you for the reply. This is probably why I am having a hard time identifying some of these insects, they are not adults. For number two, I thought some type of leafhopper, but nothing looked like this in the guide.

There is so much Queen Anne's Lace in the surrounding area that at home I do pull. I've not noticed any caterpillars on them. I'll look more closely. If something is going to eat them, they can have it.

Maximilian was referring to my sunflowers. It was no larger than an Asian beetle. I've not seen them again, but haven't been looking. I've been noticing the pollinators on these flowers.

And there are quite a few of the Large Milkweed Bugs on the Common milkweed along side the road.
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Old 08-04-2014, 01:21 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by turttle View Post
Depending on size, the orange and black beetle is probably a milkweed beetle,
Species Labidomera clivicollis - Swamp Milkweed Leaf Beetle - BugGuide.Net
Could be, but that second black and yellow insect probably isn't because from what I'm seeing, the milkweed leaf beetles do not have any yellow on the front part of their body.
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Old 09-06-2014, 06:26 PM   #19
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More little "fellows"...

The first photo is some hairy caterpillar I found on my dress, so I have no idea what it would feed on. I hope not me. :P I took it back out, but just set it out in our wannabe prairie were I was working earlier. I should have measure this, but it was longer than an inch, but not quite two.

The second one I am guessing is the larvae for a geometer moth because it was stiffened up when I tried getting a better look. It sure did blend in with the Ironweed. Can this be narrowed down to species?

Thank you again.
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Old 09-06-2014, 07:46 PM   #20
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I love those furry caterpillars. I chased a tan fuzzy caterpillar out of the barn today. It was moving fast. I think it came in on the mower.
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