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Old 08-24-2012, 06:00 PM   #11
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it was an ambush bug in the family Reduviidae (assassin bugs) they used to be considered as a separate family (Phymatidae).
It says used to.....So are, the assassin and ambush bugs one in the same? I can see why I'm confused.
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Old 08-24-2012, 09:24 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by havalotta View Post
Suunto did state
Quote:
it was an ambush bug in the family Reduviidae (assassin bugs) they used to be considered as a separate family (Phymatidae).
It says used to.....So are, the assassin and ambush bugs one in the same? I can see why I'm confused.
I missed that...so I guess now I'm confused too.
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Old 08-25-2012, 05:57 AM   #13
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Suunto did state
It says used to.....So are, the assassin and ambush bugs one in the same? I can see why I'm confused.
It's not all that confusing; this sort of taxonomic 'rearrangement' is fairly common as more data on certain groups are studied, especially with the advent of genetic analyses.
Because of their rather peculiar physical appearance, ambush bugs initially were placed in a family (Phymatidae) of their own, but more intensive study led taxonomists to realize that they really were a subset of the assassin bug family, Reduviidae. So now ambush bugs constitute a subfamily (Phymatinae) of assassin bugs, along with several other subfamilies.
This also has happened with some moths; the tiger moths (adults of woolly bears and relatives) used to be in the family Arctiidae, but a few years ago, this family was reduced to subfamily (Arctiinae) status under the family Erebidae, which in turn had been split off from the family Noctuidae!
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Old 08-25-2012, 07:33 AM   #14
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Kind of the same thing with naming plants and putting them under their proper headings.
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ambush bug, assassin, bug, classification, family, identification, identify, insect id, nymph, office, phymatinae, sinea, spiny, subfamily, taxonomic, visitor

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