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Old 05-21-2012, 09:05 PM   #1
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Default big moth, little moth

First, for the world's tiniest moth (maybe not, but it is pretty small, 2-3 mm) on an oxeye daisy.

big moth, little moth-moth-id-daisy.jpg

Second, this fellow ended up stuck on my pitcher plant flower - I found him in the same position a week later and realized he was dead, stuck to the flowers. He looks like some kind of sphinx moth. Can you tell any more from the photo? When I tried to get his corpse for better photos it kind of crumbled...oops.

big moth, little moth-moth-pitcher-plant-flower-id.jpg
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Old 05-22-2012, 10:00 AM   #2
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Originally Posted by turttle View Post
First, for the world's tiniest moth (maybe not, but it is pretty small, 2-3 mm) on an oxeye daisy.

Attachment 29623He looks like some kind of sphinx moth. Can you tell any more from the photo? When I tried to get his corpse for better photos it kind of crumbled...oops.
The tiny moth is among the hundreds (if not thousands) of unrelated species in many families collectively known as microlepidoptera (I prefer the term 'Ittabittidae') - see Microlepidoptera - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The large one is indeed a sphinx moth, perhaps the lettered sphinx, Deidamia inscriptum - see Deidamia inscriptum for an image.
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Old 05-22-2012, 06:46 PM   #3
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I love it! Ittabittadae! That is perfect.

I have never noticed them before. Thank you suunto.
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Old 10-10-2012, 09:12 PM   #4
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Big moth, little moth
big moth, little moth-dscf6349.jpg
wet moth
big moth, little moth-dscf6488.jpg
fuzzy moth
big moth, little moth-dscf6404.jpg
cling on .......window moth
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Old 10-11-2012, 03:56 AM   #5
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Big moth, little moth
Attachment 32867
wet moth
Attachment 32868
fuzzy moth
Attachment 32869
cling on .......window moth
I cannot see enough detail in the first image to hazard much to be in of an opinion other than it appears to be in the superfamily Noctuoidea; the second one is a noctuid in the genus Catacola - see Butterflies and Moths of North America | collecting and sharing data about Lepidoptera for a likely suspect. The third one appears to be in the family Geometridae, but it cannot be further identified from this aspect.
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Old 10-11-2012, 12:57 PM   #6
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It cannot be further identified from this aspect.
Too see through? A Back shot probably would have been better.
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Old 10-12-2012, 03:53 AM   #7
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A Back shot probably would have been better.
Yes. The dorsal wing pattern usually has more diagnostic characters.
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