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Old 06-23-2009, 01:00 PM   #1
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Default Why organic gardens?

Which books helped you to make the connection between organic gardening, health, and the environment?

Which authors were instrumental in helping you to "see the light"?

Which books would you loan to a friend who is curious about organic gardening?

Please share your favorite "Why" books on this thread!

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For each book, include title and author, plus an explanatory sentence or two if you have time. If you have more to say about the book, please also open a new "BOOK" thread, so others can learn about and discuss the book.

List as many or as few books as you like.

Thanks!
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Old 06-24-2009, 09:00 AM   #2
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Why would you not want to? Hopefully that's a rhetorical question, since not all organic gardeners are dope smoking hippy types. It is a valid methology.

Organic Gardening Book List
Vegetables
Let it Rot! The Gardener’s Guide to Composting by Stu Campbell

Rodale Illustrated Encyclopedia of Organic Gardening

The Gardener’s A-Z Guide to Growing Organic Food by Tanya L. K. Denckla

Four Season Harvest 2nd ed by Eliot Coleman

Dictionary of Plant Names by Alan Coombes

Please see The Rodale Institute Store - Home for additional texts using organic methods of gardening

Rodale is considered the “Mecca” for organic gardeners

I rarely have to use books to illustrate, my garden says it all.
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Old 06-24-2009, 10:27 AM   #3
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I'll toss in Life in the Soil: A Guide for Naturalists and Gardeners by James Nardi into the mix, Amazon.com: Life in the Soil: A Guide for Naturalists and Gardeners: James B. Nardi: Books Let it Rot looks good.
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Old 06-24-2009, 10:33 AM   #4
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A friend of mine wrote this on another website this morning: (I don't think she will mind that I copied it here)

Quote:
Here's why you don't use pesticides. My rose that Sandy gave me, which has the most beautiful pink-edged, blue-green leaves and the tiniest pink, yellow-centered flowers that I've ever seen on a rose, has been looking a little moth eaten lately, which I attributed to bleach overspray from my Neighbor Jim. Yesterday and this morning, I have had three chickadees sitting on that rose not two feet from me in my bed (through the window). It didn't seem likely, but it appeared that Mama was biting off leaf pieces and feeding it to her to babes, and I was hoping that the bleach had washed off. Then I realized that she's feeding them little tiny green worms. The babies are trying to catch their own worms, but they're nervous, shivery and wobbly on the branch.
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Old 06-25-2009, 11:31 AM   #5
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Sounds like you have sawflies on your roses, she's doing a good job of eliminating the pests. BT is not effective on these as they are not a true worm, but insecticidal soap will take care of most of the problem and won't hurt the birds.
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Old 06-25-2009, 11:42 AM   #6
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Yes, but if you get rid of the worms, then the birds won't have anything to eat on your flowers... and you won't get to watch wobbling chicks being fed by their mom.

Part of organic gardening is to accept insect damage. Most plants can tolerate quite a bit of insect damage. The natural predators like birds, and other insects, do the work, so you don't have to.

If you crack out the insecticide - you won't have predator insects either.
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Old 06-25-2009, 11:50 AM   #7
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And the list goes on
For the no-till group:
Lasagna Gardening by Patricia Lanza
Lasagna Gardening for Small Spaces by Patricia Lanza
The Organic Gardener’s Handbook of Natural Insect and Disease Control edited by Barbara W. Ellis and Fern Marshall Bradley I believe Rodale Press has come out with an updated copy
Rodale’s Encyclopedia of Herbs
And then once you’ve harvested your produce there’s
The Complete Guide to Home Canning and Preserving by the US Dept of Agriculture, 2nd addition-I highly recommend this as it has all the latest information on canning food safely.
Rodale’s Preserving Summer’s Bounty
Rodale’s Stocking Up, The Classic Preserving Guide (revised, updated, 3rd edition)

Both are available for a nominal cost and contain good information on canning safety as well as great recipes.
Ball’s Canning Guide
Kerr’s Canning Guide

Articles from Mother Earth, especially the older archived copies. Not only do they contain information on organic gardening and methods, they are loaded with information on various sustainable practices and many ideas that lead into the permaculture movement.
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Old 01-26-2010, 01:37 PM   #8
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Here's a few:

How To Grow More Vegetables* by John Jeavons
The Complete Compost Gardening Guide by Barbara Pleasant
Garden Anywhere by Alys Fowler
Teaming With Microbes: A Gardener's Guide To The Soil Food Web by Jeff Lowenfels
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Old 02-06-2010, 09:34 PM   #9
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Jeff Lowenfels book is an excellent suggestion.
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