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Old 09-03-2013, 11:44 AM   #11
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The next essay up for discussion from City Wilds: Essays and Stories about Urban Nature Paperback
by Terrell F. Dixon (Editor).
Loved the first essay(pdf link was provided http://library.fws.gov/wildread/Zip-...h_Heistand.pdf ) but have not read Paradise Of Frogs,still waiting for the book. I will read before commenting but it appears to be about a gardener that finds his traditional gardening has caused all the frogs to disappear from the property. He decides to change that. I will enjoy reading his story.

Tuesday, September 3, 2013A Paradise of Frogs
by John Hanson Mitchell
Moderator: Jim Siegel, FWS - NCTC

Questions posed for discussion...

Quote:
After reading the short excerpt, have you ever tried to re-wild a place?
Quote:

Is this even possible given the American ideal is mowing, trimming and landscaping for a well manicured lawn?
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Old 09-07-2013, 02:19 PM   #12
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A Paradise Of Frogs by John Hanson Mitchell is a short essay,number 10 in City Wilds. It is about a suburban property that once was farmland. Falling out buildings and weed grown fields back up to a nice woods. So many of these old farms bought with the thought to get away from the more urban areas. It was nice how frogs were everywhere. As a young man the new owner had admired a picture of Mark Twain, dressed in summer whites with a cane fishing pole. It is said Twain fed strips of meat hanging from that pole to feed the bullfrogs.
The frogs were welcome but he felt the need to clean up the property. Mow and tear down the old buildings,plant a few flower beds like one thinks must be necessary. All the frogs slowly disappear. He has read about the decline of frogs and begins to think he erred in going about the property changes so decides to try a different approach.
He adds a couple of ponds and makes plans for a big pond. He builds small out buildings and lets plants grow up around them. He quits mowing and begins using a scythe in areas where he would like to keep woody plants out. The garden beds are allowed to grow out and brush is allowed to grow along property edges. He sees a return of some of the frogs.
With increased development all around him he still finds it worth while to maintain a habitat for the frogs on at least his own property. He intends to buy a white suit...

Nice story of a rewilding before it was too late.
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Old 09-07-2013, 02:50 PM   #13
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The questions posed for A Paradise Of Frogs...

Quote:
After reading the short excerpt, have you ever tried to re-wild a place?


Quote:
Is this even possible given the American ideal is mowing, trimming and landscaping for a well manicured lawn?
These questions can be answered even if you have not read the piece. It is what many here do all the time.

I do what rewilding is possible within legal constraints everywhere I have lived. Even if it is only birds and rabbits and insects that come into our small very urban garden. Seeing hawks and on occassion coyotes right outside our window tells me somethings are happening. The bees, some years hundreds at a time, dragonflies and fireflies,cicadas,strange beetles and bugs, birds and rabbits nesting,young squirrels playing...etc... may not a wilderness make but it is better than the almost lifeless average lawn. At least it seems so to me. Not to replace larger wildlife spaces. We need to support maintaining as much of the wilder places as possible. But to buffer the urban sprawl so that diversity gets a chance.

Is this possible in our current world reality? Will laws tighten to suppress these rewilded urban habitats?
An educational process is taking place. Like the new property owner in the story A Paradise Of Frogs, many know all is not as it should be and want to make it right. Like the sound of spring peepers rising, the voices of those of us committed to make a difference will be heard.
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Old 09-09-2013, 11:00 AM   #14
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The Pdf in case you would like to read A Paradise Of Frogs. Somehow I missed that it was provided.

http://americaswildlife.org/wp-conte...e-of-Frogs.pdf
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Old 09-09-2013, 11:20 AM   #15
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Today is the introduction of the next essay chosen from City Wilds at America's WILD READ .

Disturbing the Universe by Betsy Hilbert a pdf excerpt.
http://americaswildlife.org/wp-conte...e-Universe.pdf


Introducing Author Betsy Hilbert and Moderator Debbie Beer
America's WILD READ: Introducing Author Betsy Hilbert and Moderator Debbie Beer

Author Betsy Hilbert
Hilbert has taught in the Independent Studies Department at Miami-Dade Community College since the mid-sixties, and she is known for her scholarly work on women's nature writing as well as her literary essays about the natural world.

Debbie Beer
Communications Chairperson, Friends of Heinz Refuge, Philadelphia
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Old 09-09-2013, 08:40 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gloria View Post
The questions posed for A Paradise Of Frogs...





These questions can be answered even if you have not read the piece. It is what many here do all the time.

I do what rewilding is possible within legal constraints everywhere I have lived. Even if it is only birds and rabbits and insects that come into our small very urban garden. Seeing hawks and on occassion coyotes right outside our window tells me somethings are happening. The bees, some years hundreds at a time, dragonflies and fireflies,cicadas,strange beetles and bugs, birds and rabbits nesting,young squirrels playing...etc... may not a wilderness make but it is better than the almost lifeless average lawn. At least it seems so to me. Not to replace larger wildlife spaces. We need to support maintaining as much of the wilder places as possible. But to buffer the urban sprawl so that diversity gets a chance.

Is this possible in our current world reality? Will laws tighten to suppress these rewilded urban habitats?
An educational process is taking place. Like the new property owner in the story A Paradise Of Frogs, many know all is not as it should be and want to make it right. Like the sound of spring peepers rising, the voices of those of us committed to make a difference will be heard.
I enjoyed this short. Like the author a tried for a couple of springs to reintroduce frogs to our property. Dragonfly larva that had already taken up residence in the ponds so I don't think they let the tadpoles mature, or the environment was just not right. Where we used to hear and occasionally see tree frogs we just don't any more. I miss that sound during and/or after a rain.
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Old 09-09-2013, 09:06 PM   #17
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Disturbing the Universe made me think of my species as the rats of the world, too many of us, doing too much harm with our sheer numbers and size. That being said, I think we all want to do something and try to find ways that lessen our impact. It is not just rescuing turtle nests. It could be recycling, conserving water, planting for wildlife, having bird feeders. Do any of these or the multitude of little things we do because of our love of nature help or are some harmful?
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Old 09-10-2013, 03:03 PM   #18
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http://americaswildlife.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/Disturbing-the-Universe.pdf

I suppose Disturbing The universe was chosen not specificly because of its content on Loggerhead turtles but more likely to examine how we feel about human intervention efforts.
I have decided to do a bit of information gathering about these turtles anyway because one must have some knowledge to use in efforts for wildlife and the environment, be that learned from trusted sources or on the job as intern or volunteer, to give us confidence that what we do is the right thing to do.
I'm not sure when this particular essay was written but it seems to be before the current genetic identification and tracking abilities. Still very relevant though, in my opinion, is the future ramifications of helping and allowing animals to survive that may always need our help. What is the genetic evolutional significance of these interventions?

Quote:
STATUS: The loggerhead sea turtle was initially listed as threatened throughout its range (Federal Register, July 28, 1978). On September 22, 2011, the listing was revised from a single global threatened species to a listing of nine Distinct Population Segments (DPS); four listed as threatened (Northwest Atlantic Ocean, South Atlantic Ocean, Southwest Indian Ocean, Southeast Indo-Pacific Ocean, and South Atlantic Ocean DPSs) and five listed as endangered (Northeast Atlantic Ocean, Mediterranean Sea, North Pacific Ocean, South Pacific Ocean, and North Indian Ocean DPSs).
Quote:
Most loggerhead hatchlings originating from U.S. beaches are believed to lead a pelagic existence in the North Atlantic gyre for an extended period of time, perhaps as long as 7 to 12 years, and are best known from the eastern Atlantic near the Azores and Madeira. Post-hatchlings have been found floating at sea in association with Sargassum rafts. Once they reach a certain size, these juvenile loggerheads begin recruiting to coastal areas in the western Atlantic where they become benthic feeders in lagoons, estuaries, bays, river mouths, and shallow coastal waters. These juveniles occupy coastal feeding grounds for about 13 to 20 years before maturing and making their first reproductive migration, the females returning to their natal beach to nest.
Quote:
REPRODUCTION AND DEVELOPMENT: The U.S. nesting season occurs from April through September, with a peak in June and July. Nesting occurs primarily at night. Loggerheads are known to nest from one to seven times within a nesting season (mean is about 4.1 nests per season) at intervals of approximately 14 days. Mean clutch size varies from about 100 to 126 along the southeastern U.S. coast. Incubation duration ranges from about 42 to 75 days, depending on incubation temperatures, but averages 55-60 days for most clutches in Florida. Hatchlings generally emerge at night. Remigration intervals of 2 to 3 years are most common in nesting loggerheads, but remigration can vary from 1 to 7 years. Age at sexual maturity is believed to be about 32 to 35 years.
Five recovery units have been identified in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean DPS based on genetic differences and a combination of geographic distribution of nesting densities, geographic separation, and geopolitical boundaries. Recovery units are subunits of a listed species that are geographically or otherwise identifiable and essential to the recovery of the species. Recovery units are individually necessary to conserve genetic robustness, demographic robustness, important life history stages, or some other feature necessary for long-term sustainability of the species
Quote:
REASONS FOR CURRENT STATUS: Threats include loss or degradation of nesting habitat from coastal development and beach armoring; disorientation of hatchlings by beachfront lighting; nest predation by native and non-native predators; degradation of foraging habitat; marine pollution and debris; watercraft strikes; disease; and incidental take from channel dredging and commercial trawling, longline, and gill net fisheries. There is particular concern about the extensive incidental take of juvenile loggerheads in the eastern Atlantic by longline fishing vessels from several countries.
Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) for the Second Revision to the Northwest Atlantic Population of the Loggerhead Sea Turtle (Caretta caretta)Recovery Plan



Listing status and biological information of Loggerhead sea turtles | North Florida ESO Jacksonville
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Old 09-11-2013, 08:29 AM   #19
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Great follow up Gloria. Their lifetime range is certainly much larger than a set of beaches in a single region.
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Old 09-12-2013, 06:16 PM   #20
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In Besty Hilbert's story of searching for endangered loggerhead turtle nesting sites we are taken through her day on the beaches of Miami. They find signs ,first turtle crawl in the sand then a very large disturbed area of sand where the turtle mama seems to have tried to hide her nest and eggs within the larger disturbance she has created. The digging up of the eggs, each about the size of a ping pong ball, is careful so as not to break the eggs. Each one is removed (114 eggs) and placed in an egg carrier exactly as they are found in the nest because, she says, the embryos bond to the shells and must remain in the correct position when reburied in a protected site.

The search for the turtle nests along the beaches is the story of this persons sense of wonder in nature but also a reminder of all the activity of humans on these beaches and the many things that could go wrong in the lives of these turtles over a lifetime and beyond. She wonders if what she does is right, could these efforts cause too many turtles to survive for a sufficient food supply or would the turtles mature and not be able to find nesting sites on ever more developed coastal waters.
In the end she decides that even with limited knowledge action is the better choice.

Thursday, September 12, 2013
"Disturbing the Universe" by Author Betsy Hilbert
Read the commentary by Debbie Beer
http://www.wildread.blogspot.com/201...tsy.html#links
Her question today...
Quote:
We know only that action is perpetual; people will continue to save turtles, develop condos, and picnic on the beach. You have an individual choice to do nothing, or to act as you see fit. What would you do?
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