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Old 11-18-2012, 10:28 PM   #61
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HOUSE SPARROWS / Part 1
The Round Table Conferences
Understanding House Sparrows

Understanding House Sparrows - PMS, NA Round Table Conferences
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Yes, I definitely believe in the wring the neck method, gruesome as it sounds, and I also immediately apply pressure on the windpipe and heart which results in death within seconds. In my case, practice makes perfect. Just that country-girl Texas practicality at work, I guess!
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Old 11-18-2012, 10:33 PM   #62
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scarecrow> repeat.... you won't regret signing up!!! You gotta go and tell me what you think!!! After 2 weekends.... you should be a good enough shot to get em from about 50' away. I kid you not.... the instructors volunteering at these events are that good!!!
I am hoping that I will get to in the next coupla months as I sure would like to pop those Eurasian Collared Doves getting fat on my sunflower seed! They look like they would be good eating too! The Cooper's Hawk catches one every now and then, but I would like to thin the local population a little more.
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Old 12-07-2012, 02:17 PM   #63
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You go girl!!! I got up enough nerve after going to an appleseed to kill 1 of my own chickens that got hung up on a hanging bird feeder. It was in too rough of shape and woulda never made it even if I could afford the vet bill and I didn't want it suffering until my husband came home so I actually pulled the trigger. The .22 didn't fire so I tried it again and again trying to put it out of its misery and still ended up waiting for my husband to come home but.... I'm such a good shot now that I had enough confidence to do it without worrying about missing or making a chick suffer more.
--
I don't know about eating em but I know there's recipes out there for pigeons that would probably work. If you use non-lead shot.... you could always just let any vultures you've got have at em. Waste not want not. Vultures gotta eat too!!!
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Old 12-07-2012, 09:50 PM   #64
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Chickens do know how to get into trouble, don't they? Looks like you did what you needed to do---hey, at least that was one happy chicken 'til it met its end. I feel so sorry for those poor factory farm birds, crammed cheek to jowl from birth to death in tiny cages. Just plain shameful. Good point about the lead shot. Better get some steel shot if we ever get serious about eating EURACs. But I have no problem with feeding vultures, either!
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Old 12-08-2012, 12:37 PM   #65
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Those doves have more breast meat than our mourning dove. Invasive - non-native - pop, pop, pop - legal. They are a snap to clean. A straight slice down the breast bone, then just slide your thumbs under the breast meat. They pop out and you just have to rinse them off. Wrap in bacon for tasty snacks!

I started feeding the birds about a month ago. Six HOSP have come and gone. I don't even have a smart one to annoy me this winter.

I see that the USFWS may get serious about or mute swan problem. That would be nice, if they can keep PETA busy working on what they do best - euthanizing cats and dogs.
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Old 12-08-2012, 09:28 PM   #66
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Those doves have more breast meat than our mourning dove. Invasive - non-native - pop, pop, pop - legal. They are a snap to clean. A straight slice down the breast bone, then just slide your thumbs under the breast meat. They pop out and you just have to rinse them off. Wrap in bacon for tasty snacks!
Well, mine sure ought to have good breast meat as fat as they are! Sounds yummy. Thanks for the advice!
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Old 11-08-2013, 10:32 AM   #67
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Success!!! For years HOSPs have been raising their young under the eaves of the entrance to a friend’s house and for years I’ve been asking her to let me stomp on the eggs and knock down the nests. Her husband thought they were “cute” so they were left alone until…. I printed off this Diseases Caused by Pigeons, Sparrows, Geese and Starlings!, and this, Managing House Sparrows and handed it to him telling him we weren't spring chickens anymore and their poops were getting tracked in the house. Next thing I know…. the nests were gone!!! Yay!!! Turns out “grandpa” had built some bluebird nest boxes with their granddaughter and had put them up in their back yard!!! I guess grandpa didn’t want to risk his little girl finding pecked in bluebird skulls on the ground. Forgive me but…. I plan on “rubbing” in that I was right…. I’m going to make a thank you card using a photo I took of a baby chickadee that fledged from a decorative birdhouse I have on my patio and I’m going to add a little birdie foot print to it and thank him for giving chickadees a better chance of fledging and raising young of their own. He’ll crack up laughing because he’ll probably figure out I got a blow by blow account from his wife of how he looked at the photo of the HOSP inside the nest box pecking the egg and marched right outside with a look of determination on his face then got a ladder and took down all the nests then stuffed old shirts where the nests used to be so they couldn’t re-build next spring.
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Old 11-10-2013, 10:28 AM   #68
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I would take the old shirts out and put a nice screen up. Other than that, mission accomplished!

I heard that terrible thud last weekend. I have a lot of windows, but even with bird strike decals, I still get a couple of window strikes each year. Having watched, many of these are caused by a bird being chased by a hawk. I have a few local house sparrows, but keep them manageable by shooting. When regulars start to show up, they are removed. Having just started feeding for winter, the birds are finding the seed quickly. I went to see what kind of bird hit the window and if it was just stunned. I have never been so surprised!
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Old 11-11-2013, 12:46 PM   #69
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The old shirts are better than nothing. I know my friends.... they can't spend $$$ on hardware cloth or whatever when old shirts will work. I'm just really thankful they eliminated a hosp breeding site and now.... the next time I see a nest in their old shirts.... I'll be able to knock it down and I can destroy any eggs in it. I'm thinking I'm going to order them a nest box trap as a gift. They're in the middle of an urban setting and I doubt seriously if they'll ever get anything but HOSPs in the bluebird nest boxes they made but.... no biggie.... I'm there late at night and I've got no problems sticking a pillow case over the bird houses and bringing home any HOSPs to my husband to take care of.
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Old 11-12-2013, 08:04 AM   #70
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Find a large, thick mil, transparent plastic bag. It slips over easily and you can see what is going on inside. Easy to ID the species, if not target species. Nothing to trap claws in. Keep a backup in case you get a rip. Works better than anything I tried.

That's the right attitude. Just do what you can and help, if you and others are willing!
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bird, bird house, birdhouse, birds, bluebird house, bluebirds, english, hosp, house, house sparrow, invasive birds, invasive species, managing, sparrow, sparrow spooker, sparrow trap, sparrows, trap, use for raptor rehabilitators

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