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Old 02-16-2012, 02:24 PM   #1
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finch Giving Birds What They Need, Where They Need It

Giving Birds What They Need, Where They Need It
Douglas W. Tallamy

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But birders everywhere are also united by the unhappy realization that birds, especially many species once common in the United States, are disappearing. ... One-third of North American bird species are rapidly declining, threatened or endangered.
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You have just pictured two of the most harmful features of todayís landscapes. First, they contain just a tiny fraction of the plants that once grew there. Whatís more, the plants we do put in our landscapes are largely from someplace else.
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Landscaping with native plants is not just for bird-lovers; itís for human lovers too. If we create a world that does not support a diversity of birds, we will have created a world that will not be able to sustain humans for very long.
Bird City Wisconsin - Photos
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Old 02-16-2012, 03:33 PM   #2
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Every time I read something Tallamy writes I'm inspired to just go out and plant trees! I never thought about habitat restoration all the way down to the insects before finding his stuff (on this forum). Keep it coming.
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Old 02-16-2012, 08:42 PM   #3
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Great quotes, Cirsium. Let's hope more and more people are inspired to embrace natives and create natural areas. I think there are a lot of bird lovers out there...so, hopefully they will become native plant enthusiasts too--especially when they see the wonderful effect it has on attracting their feathered friends.

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Every time I read something Tallamy writes I'm inspired to just go out and plant trees! I never thought about habitat restoration all the way down to the insects before finding his stuff (on this forum). Keep it coming.
Great, recurve! I'm glad you are a convert! I'm leaning a lot more toward restoration than just landscaping with natives--I'm hoping I find the right balance.
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Old 02-17-2012, 11:47 AM   #4
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Tallamy does an excellent job of articulating information and relating that information to our lives.
Native trees and shrubs in the landscape can add much to the habitat value of your land and you do not have to become an avid gardener to achieve a wildlife corridor. I think that the thought of much additional outside work requiring knowledge and skill and time is just as much a part of the reluctance to change from so much lawn as is the love of lawns. Pushing around a lawn mower takes a bit of time but is very simple and the kids can do it or you may hire it out.
But there are a lot of bird lovers watching bird feeders that just might be convinced to help raise more birds.
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Old 02-18-2012, 05:09 PM   #5
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Tallamy does an excellent job of articulating information and relating that information to our lives.
Native trees and shrubs in the landscape can add much to the habitat value of your land and you do not have to become an avid gardener to achieve a wildlife corridor. I think that the thought of much additional outside work requiring knowledge and skill and time is just as much a part of the reluctance to change from so much lawn as is the love of lawns. Pushing around a lawn mower takes a bit of time but is very simple and the kids can do it or you may hire it out.
Yes, he does, so let's hope it sinks in with the general public.

I think you have a point about the perception of more work...or the need for specialized skills. As for adding to the "habitat value", I agree of course, but in addition to this, (based on one of the video links provided on WG) there is the very real possibility that natural (native), diverse, complex (and beautiful) landscapes will be worth more (from a real estate perspective) since they are increasingly rare--at least that was the theory of a native plant landscaper...with whom I happen to agree.

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But there are a lot of bird lovers watching bird feeders that just might be convinced to help raise more birds.
Yes. I think they are our greatest hope.
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Old 02-19-2012, 07:25 PM   #6
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When I read Tallamy, I start rethinking my fantasized front yard meadow and wondering if I should plant a pocket woodland instead. (So many plants, so little room...)
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Old 02-20-2012, 01:03 PM   #7
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When I read Tallamy, I start rethinking my fantasized front yard meadow and wondering if I should plant a pocket woodland instead. (So many plants, so little room...)
If you can manage it, try for both...or anything that provides an "edge habitat"...like where meadow meets shrubs or shrubs meet woodland. From what I've read in the past, these are the places of most diversity.
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Old 02-20-2012, 01:05 PM   #8
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Also, I think that planting woodlands is great, but I'm *guessing* that there is more of a lack of meadow/prairie plants than there is of woodlands.
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Old 02-20-2012, 09:58 PM   #9
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We have 60-year-old trees in the back yard (oak, maple, pine, and hemlock) and two young serviceberries on the other side of the front walk (and are about to get three gray dogwood), so we very nearly have an edge habitat.
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Old 02-21-2012, 05:01 PM   #10
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We have 60-year-old trees in the back yard (oak, maple, pine, and hemlock) and two young serviceberries on the other side of the front walk (and are about to get three gray dogwood), so we very nearly have an edge habitat.
Sounds great! I bet the birds will love it.

I forgot that you had some larger older trees. Is it more of a woodland setting or could you make it more of a savannah in some areas? (I'm just trying to get you the best of both worlds. )
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