Wildlife Gardeners - North American Wildlife Gardening  

Go Back   Wildlife Gardeners - North American Wildlife Gardening > Wildlife Gardeners of North America Unite > Birds Including Raptors & Hummers

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 11-30-2010, 11:14 PM   #1
Curious George & UAOKA recipient
 
turttle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Chapel Hill, NC
Default raptor deterrents

HawkWatch International - Keeping Raptors Out: Why HWI undertook a project to minimize raptor presence in Wyoming

HawkWatch International is conducting research to see if adding perch guards (which look like putting rake tines on) on power poles and their cross ties, will deter raptors and ravens from perching on them. Apparently putting in new powerlines across previously open areas, in this case a prairie in southern Wyoming, creates perches where previously there were none. There is concern that the added perches will allow the raptors to prey more effectively on the Sage Grouse, Sage Thrasher, and Pygmy Rabbit in that area, all of which are "of management concern".

I have frequently seen hawks on power/telephone poles/street lights etc, especially alongside highways, but had never really thought of this as an unfair advantage for them to have over their prey. Given how much habitat we have taken from these raptors, do they deserve to have a few man-made perches or should we take the side of the prey animals?
__________________
There is pleasure in the pathless woods, there is rapture in the lonely shore, this is society where none intrudes, by the deep sea, and music in its roar. - Lord Byron

Turttle's pollinator garden
turttle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-01-2010, 06:26 PM   #2
POM Judge & Official Non Gardener
 
Sage's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Buffalo, NY, USA
Default

Gudgreef! As a raptor lover I am appalled at such a complaint. Most raptors focus mainly on rodents, mice, rats, and even snakes.
Sage is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-01-2010, 09:55 PM   #3
WG Facebook Administrator
 
amelanchier's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Lyme, NH
Default

This issue is really only a concern in the shortgrass prairie and desert regions of the country, where trees were originally virtually nonexistent.
__________________
"I take the part of the trees as against all their enemies." -J.R.R. Tolkien
amelanchier is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-04-2010, 05:10 PM   #4
Curious George & UAOKA recipient
 
turttle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Chapel Hill, NC
Default

I guess I am on the raptor's side on this, too. Good grief, indeed.
__________________
There is pleasure in the pathless woods, there is rapture in the lonely shore, this is society where none intrudes, by the deep sea, and music in its roar. - Lord Byron

Turttle's pollinator garden
turttle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-10-2010, 05:40 PM   #5
Official Plant Nerd
 
Equilibrium's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Default

With everybody and their brother out there cutting down and hauling off snags for.... aesthetic reasons... I guess I just don't see what the big deal is. Think of it as giving raptors back something we keep taking away from them.... a not-so-strategically located place to hang out to find a meal below.
__________________
"Be who you are and say what you feel, because those who mind don't matter and those who matter don't mind."
- Dr. Seuss
Equilibrium is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-11-2010, 03:12 PM   #6
Curious George & UAOKA recipient
 
turttle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Chapel Hill, NC
Default

I agree. These raptor deterrents were in places that didn't have trees before, but we are eliminating enough of their natural habitat that giving them a leg up elsewhere seems not unreasonable, although the local denizens might disagree.
__________________
There is pleasure in the pathless woods, there is rapture in the lonely shore, this is society where none intrudes, by the deep sea, and music in its roar. - Lord Byron

Turttle's pollinator garden
turttle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-12-2010, 11:09 AM   #7
WG Facebook Administrator
 
amelanchier's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Lyme, NH
Default

Well, it's tough, because the species they're trying to protect, like sage grouse and pygmy rabbit, are threatened & have limited geographic ranges.
__________________
"I take the part of the trees as against all their enemies." -J.R.R. Tolkien
amelanchier is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-12-2010, 11:38 AM   #8
Grub
 
Runmede's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Virginia
Default

A few years ago, I took a class on Birds of Prey. Hawks miss their prey about 80-90% of the time.

Birds of prey make White Bear Lake man's day | StarTribune.com
Last paragraph on page 2
"Red-tailed hawks and other aerial predators miss their prey between 80 and 90 percent of the time. It's true these birds have evolved throughout history to hunt efficiently enough to survive. But prey species such as rabbits and mice have developed their own survival techniques."
Runmede is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-12-2010, 08:13 PM   #9
Official Plant Nerd
 
Equilibrium's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Default

amelanchier> "Well, it's tough, because the species they're trying to protect, like sage grouse and pygmy rabbit, are threatened & have limited geographic ranges." You have an extremely valid point.... for that site. I shoulda read the article instead of just the title and replies.
__________________
"Be who you are and say what you feel, because those who mind don't matter and those who matter don't mind."
- Dr. Seuss
Equilibrium is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-12-2010, 08:14 PM   #10
Fox
 
benj1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Chesterfield, Virginia
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Runmede View Post
"Red-tailed hawks and other aerial predators miss their prey between 80 and 90 percent of the time. It's true these birds have evolved throughout history to hunt efficiently enough to survive. But prey species such as rabbits and mice have developed their own survival techniques."
Which brings us back to the "balance of nature" concept. Both predator and prey species have survived in a remarkable natural balance, although we know the balance is more like a see-saw. Every winter I am entertained by the downy woodpeckers, who freeze in position whenever they sense danger from above. The cruising raptor, not detecting any movement, will eventually spot a target elsewhere.

Putting power-line poles in a treeless plain will upset the natural balance that was in effect there. A new balance might not be achieved in which the endangered species survive.
benj1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
bird, brids, deter, deter raptors, deterrents, guards, hawkwatch, hawkwatch international, management, perch, perch guards, predator, predator birds, predators, prey, pygmy rabbit, raptor, raptor deterrents, raptors, ravens, research, rodents, sage grouse, sage thrasher, wyoming

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:30 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2