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Old 11-18-2010, 02:22 AM   #1
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Waxwings so hungry they are tame - Telegraph

Illustrates just how tiredness and hunger can eliminate caution.
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Old 11-18-2010, 08:25 AM   #2
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These are Bohemian Waxwings, the same ones that appear in the the northern and western US in winter.
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Old 11-18-2010, 07:04 PM   #3
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Cool pic!

I'd love to get cedar waxwings around here. I can't wait until my black gum trees are old enough to produce berries--maybe that will attract them.
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Old 11-18-2010, 07:34 PM   #4
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Cool pic!

I'd love to get cedar waxwings around here. I can't wait until my black gum trees are old enough to produce berries--maybe that will attract them.
I've never seen a Bohemian waxwing in my yard, but each year in February when the viburnum trilobum berries finally become palatable, the cedar waxwing flock of about fifty birds arrives and dines for a week. This event yearly confirms the shrub's value to wildlife, as, with few berries then available, it's probably often the difference between birds surviving or succumbing to the long winter.

These viburnums are also easy to grow, indeed, I have a hedge that consists in great degree of that species about twelve or so feet tall, and they even compete well with invasives.
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Old 11-18-2010, 09:58 PM   #5
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Thanks for the heads up. I'll look into that viburnum as well. My budget doesn't match my wishlist...so, I've only added a few viburnums, so far, no viburnum trilobum...but it is on my list--moving towards the top after reading your post.
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Old 11-18-2010, 10:21 PM   #6
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I've never seen cedar waxwings in my yard, despite have lots of black gum, and now a veritable pokeweed forest. I'll have to look into viburnum trilobum. I don't know if it is native to NC; I suspect not, since I haven't heard of it. They recommend viburnum dentatum and viburnum nudum here.

What other berry-bearing shrubs do you see the birds flocking to? I've just planted winterberry holly, viburnum nudum, witch alder, witch hazel, and a bunch of random others, but have room for more if they are good ones. The bluebirds come to the pokeberry and the dogwoods. I would like to see more birds than I currently have visiting my yard.
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Old 11-19-2010, 06:59 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by turttle View Post
I've never seen cedar waxwings in my yard, despite have lots of black gum, and now a veritable pokeweed forest. I'll have to look into viburnum trilobum. I don't know if it is native to NC; I suspect not, since I haven't heard of it. They recommend viburnum dentatum and viburnum nudum here.

What other berry-bearing shrubs do you see the birds flocking to? I've just planted winterberry holly, viburnum nudum, witch alder, witch hazel, and a bunch of random others, but have room for more if they are good ones. The bluebirds come to the pokeberry and the dogwoods. I would like to see more birds than I currently have visiting my yard.
In the Spring in my yard, the plantings that draw the most desirable species is the Amelanchier canadensis of which a have seven. They draw everything moving through as well as the summer residents. But even then, as the Viburnum trilobum offers denser coverage than the Amelanchier, when they finish a snack they often retreat back into the Viburnum.
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Old 11-19-2010, 07:04 PM   #8
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jack,

I brought three serviceberry trees (Amelanchier canadensis, I think) with me and planted them here...and found one LARGE, old serviceberry already on the property...possibly Amelanchier arborea.

Last year I found one seedling that I transplanted where it could grow to maturity. Just typing this makes me long to see the property overflowing with flowering/fruiting shrubs and trees...and the birds that come with them.
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Old 11-19-2010, 08:28 PM   #9
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Thanks for the ideas, everyone! We need to get more viburnum in our yard.

I love cedar waxwings! I see flocks of them moving through at certain times of the year. I guess they don't nest anywhere near the shore. What type of habitat do they prefer for nesting?
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Old 11-20-2010, 01:55 PM   #10
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I'm a big viburnum fan, V. dentatum and V. nudum are good ones.

I've seen cedar waxwings on my dogwoods in late winter, feasting on the red dogwood fruit. It's something to see when they come they are so spectacular.
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amelanchier canadensis, attract birds, attracting, avian, bird, bird survival, birds, bohemian waxwings, cedar waxwings, dogwoods, feed, migrants, migrating birds, native plants, native shrubs, pokeweed, tired, viburnum, viburnum dentatum, viburnum nudum, viburnum trilobum, waxwing, waxwings

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