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Old 10-19-2010, 06:59 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CitraBenzoet View Post
i dont think I have seen White Pelicans around my house ever. These two pelicans have been sitting in the marsh for the last 2 days or so. Not sure if one is hurt or if they are just taking an extended rest.
Cool! White pelicans are huge, aren't they? I remember seeing my first. I didn't expect it to be so much bigger than the brown. We occasionally get them here in NJ.
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Old 10-24-2010, 10:13 AM   #12
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Rose-breasted grosbeaks, slate-colored juncos, and more ruby-crowned kinglets in the back today. The kinglets appeared to be eating New England aster seeds, which was odd because I'd never read that any birds other than wild turkeys liked aster seeds.
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Old 10-29-2010, 07:48 PM   #13
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White-throated sparrow was singing today; first one since spring. Blackbirds are gathering in large flocks.
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Old 11-03-2010, 07:39 AM   #14
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Juncos were in the backyard yesterday.

Blackbird flock passes through almost every day -
Winged migration Fall 2010-blackbirds-flocking-1.jpg Winged migration Fall 2010-blackbirds-flocking-2.jpg Winged migration Fall 2010-blackbirds-flocking-3.jpg Winged migration Fall 2010-blackbirds-flocking-4.jpg
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Old 11-03-2010, 09:17 AM   #15
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What kind of blackbirds are those? Red-winged? I didn't realize they flocked like that!
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Old 11-03-2010, 11:08 AM   #16
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The red-winged blackbirds will fly in great swirling flocks that separate into male, female, and immature birds and recombine and separate again, over and over.

Cool video:
Red Winged Blackbird Swarms Video


Starlings in Oxfordshire:

YouTube - starlings on Otmoor

Last edited by swamp thing; 11-03-2010 at 11:14 AM. Reason: trying to fix link
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Old 11-03-2010, 06:45 PM   #17
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My bluebirds are back, I don't know from where. They spent last winter in my yard, left for the summer and now have returned to eat my pokeberries. I'll let you know when the rosy- and golden-crowned kinglets get here - at least some of them winter in NC, since I've seen them hanging out at my feeders in the winter. I've seen formations of geese flying overhead here, too, which is odd because we have so many that live here year around - I've got to think these are other ones, passing us on their way farther south. No juncos yet, but I usually get a bunch, and no pine siskins or pine warblers yet either.

I am in the opposite situation from a bunch of you, waiting for the birds to arrive to spend the winter rather than to leave. There are a bunch of warblers that pass through here on their way farther south, but I haven't learned how to identify them well enough.

I am still getting stray monarchs passing through, speaking of our other winged friends.
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Old 11-04-2010, 10:00 AM   #18
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raven Turkey Vultures

Every year we see the Turkey Vultures arrive about April 1st. They nest and roost on on a steep rock bluff surrounded by hardwoods and just above a prehistoric Indian Shelter. They raise their offspring there and all they have to do is just step off the bare rock and instantly they are swept upward as an unusual vortex created by the sharp bend in the cold stream below carries them aloft. There are always about fifty of them that live here. As the summer progresses, they fly forming spiraling acrobatics and sometimes just sit down by the river in huge dead willow trees with their wings held out to their side. It is an erie scene in a dense foggy morning. As summer wains and the fall arrives, vultures start congregating at our place and numbers as high as 200 all assemble and soon form a huge swirling spiral vortex almost disappearing skyward. Then, the next day they are all gone. Nature has sounded the migration bell and they obey. We'll miss them this winter but look forward to their return again in the spring.

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Old 11-04-2010, 10:04 AM   #19
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We just saw a flock of birds fly overhead... not sure if they were geese or something else. They didn't have the V formation. We've seen many Canada Geese, but these seemed different. They were beautiful-- the flock shifted and reformed like a living thing.

Can anyone tell from the photo what they might have been? I didn't have time to grab a tripod to zoom in, so this is all I have:
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Old 11-04-2010, 11:18 AM   #20
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I'm not sure what flew over Calliandra's house recently. Both Canada geese and sandhill cranes will form a "V" formation when there are more than a few flying together. We have recently had nearly 1000 coots resting in Lake Monona, here in Madison, but most of them have moved on, there might be a dozen left. Last week I heard a loon calling, and this individual was close enough to shoreline for me to get a good look.
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2010, back yard, bird, bird feeder, bird feeders, bird migration, birds, blackbirds, bluebirds, fall, feeder, feeders, geese, migrate, migrating, migrating birds, migration, pelicans, ruby-crowned kinglets, season changes, seasonal migration, winged

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