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Old 05-05-2010, 02:07 PM   #31
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Default Lonicera sempervirens 'Crimson Cascade' II

Here's the same Lonicera sempervirens on 5 MAY 2010.
(And a close-up, so you can really see the detail and quantity of the blooms.)

I love my native honeysuckle--I think I feel about them the way that some people feel about roses. My suggestion for your Rose-of-Sharon friend would be to put up a short section of fence and grow Lonicera sempervirens on it!

We cut down a huge Rose-of-Sharon here and replaced it with a little Aesculus pavia sapling instead! Another great alternative, if the site is right, might be Clethra alnifolia--one of the deep pink varieties.

I don't put out any hummingbird feeders now--I don't need to!
We have eight Lonicera sempervirens growing in the yard (4 of them almost three years old and blooming nicely) and I've been scouting to find places for four more.
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Old 05-05-2010, 03:47 PM   #32
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Teresa,
Your native honeysuckles (Lonicera semperviren) are sooooooo pretty.
It must be fun to watch all the hummingbirds they attract!

I looked up Lonicera sempervirens on the web. It says Lonicera sempervirens can be grown in sun or part shade.

Are any of your native honeysuckles growing in part shade? If so, how are they doing?
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Old 05-05-2010, 11:49 PM   #33
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Wonderful honeysuckle! It must be a joy to watch the hummingbirds nectar on that plant.
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Old 06-12-2010, 11:15 PM   #34
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My earliest hummer plant is usually Carolina Jessamine. Later the penstemons are their favorites. I have Penstemon triflorus and Penstemon cobaea, later on Penstemon tenuis. This year the hummers were so impatient! They'd fly up to check the penstemons as soon as they could see the colors on the buds...and seemed so disappointed when none of them were open at first.
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Old 08-17-2010, 10:35 AM   #35
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A part of their site's hummingbird info...I was a bit surprised that they considered trees as being THAT important! Anyone attract hummers without any trees?
TPWD: Hummingbird Garden Tips
I love the hummers! The Black-chinned stay in the area to nest from spring to fall and others kinds pass through.
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Old 08-17-2010, 09:08 PM   #36
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Nice site you found. Impressive reading this comment, "While some non-native plants may do well in your garden, we would urge you to consider the impact these plants may have on our native Texas landscape and our native plants." I'm loaded with native trees and shrubs. The hummers dart back into them when they feel threatened so I'd say cover is pretty important but... I know lots of people who don't have trees and all they offer is a feeder and they've got more hummers than me. I don't think anyone with feeders only mentioned their hummers getting killed by cats or plucked from the air by hawks so you're way ahead of the game if you're planting native herbaceous perennials for them. The early plant they like by me is the Aquilegia. After that they like the penstemons and monardas and then the Impatiens capensis is always a big hit.
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Old 08-18-2010, 07:36 AM   #37
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I see that site recommends misters or drippers attached to the hose.
Does anyone use them and have a preference?
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Old 08-18-2010, 09:43 AM   #38
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Has anyone here had experience with crossvine (Bignonia capreolata) - good, bad or indifferent? We're considering adding a couple of them to our landscape, but are a bit unsure...
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Old 08-21-2010, 01:33 PM   #39
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suunto-
I have no experience with crossvine (Bignonia capreolata), because it's too cold to grow here.

I looked up some photos of that plant, and oh my, it is just gorgeous!! Check out this photo of crossvine (Bignoniacapreolata).
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Old 08-21-2010, 01:49 PM   #40
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suunto, I have a friend that grows crossvine in North east Georgia. She belongs to a group that is working on a swampy nature center in her area. She loves the crossvine. Says it is not aggressive enough in her garden to cause problems and it blooms nicely in part shade.
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