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Old 06-25-2010, 10:29 AM   #41
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'Cervical dislocation' - off topic, but it reminds me of when I worked in the Reptile House at the Cincinnati Zoo - rodents brought in for snakes were quickly dispatched in this fashion by a guy who would just fly right through it . . . grab a tail, snap the neck . . . he could do hundreds *very* quickly . . .
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Old 06-25-2010, 11:28 PM   #42
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jack396 View Post
I got the trap with the u-shaped wire that allows birds to perch on it and see beyond the floating arm to a cache of seeds. The floating arm, however, cannot support their weight when they step on to it, and when they do, they are lowered to the holding compartment where their only choice is to go into it. I have another cache of seeds in that holding compartment along with a cup of water.

Whereas yesterday, the first day, yielded two birds, today I got none.
Leave the trap in the garage for a few days. Bait an area that you can observe (seed on the ground). Don't let the seed supply run out. Observe any other species using the seed supply. When you observe a constant number of HOSP consuming the seed, place the trap, with feathers and bait, close to the feeding site. Be cautious of native bird captures. You will get the hang of it. HOSP are very smart! You should be getting juveniles soon, if not already. They are easy pickins' and don't ever breed!

Good luck!!!!
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Old 06-26-2010, 08:14 AM   #43
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None again yesterday and today. I'll put it away for a few days while baiting the area as suggested. When it becomes a regular daily feast for them, I'll put it out again. Thanks for the advice.
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Old 06-27-2010, 08:38 AM   #44
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chipmunk Nothing's simple

After an uneventful day with the trap yesterday, today I watched from my window both a female Hosp and a chipmunk get caught. I deliberated what to do about the chipmunk while the sparrow was freaking out about being in there with it. I put on gloves and held the latch open while the chipmunk finally took the risk and ran out under my hand. The sparrow is still in there waiting to be dealt with. I knew this chipmunk had made camp in the storage area out back and I suspected he would make things complicated sooner or later.

now I'm hoping he has a good memory...
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Old 06-27-2010, 12:55 PM   #45
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Way to go! You got the guy out and kept the bird in - great! If you still have the trapped female, she is your best bait. You can add some water in a small jar lid to keep your live bait hydrated.
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Old 06-27-2010, 01:10 PM   #46
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Originally Posted by fishlkmich View Post
Way to go! You got the guy out and kept the bird in - great! If you still have the trapped female, she is your best bait. You can add some water in a small jar lid to keep your live bait hydrated.
That female is no longer with us. It's raining here now, and I have the trap aside. When it stops I'll rebait it. Three females gone now, I'm still aiming for that first male. I read that if a female goes missing, the male will simply mate with a new female. But if a male goes missing, that will affect reproduction more significantly.
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Old 06-28-2010, 06:40 AM   #47
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The males help to establish territory and are usually responsible for the troubles that we have with HOSP. But, since the females reproduce, I count both as a job well done. Since I trap individuals, I have removed both males and females from nest boxes - rarely, the pair. I always remove nests when I place a trap. I keep good notes and it does not seem like abandonment or renesting is dictated by the sex of the HOSP removed. If you remove a female, the male will attempt to find a female that will accept "his" box. If you remove a male, there are plenty more looking for a female to pair with. She will normally want to nest in the same box with a new mate.

You may get frustrated, but you will get better. My site is full of HOSP every spring and at about this time of year I have always reduced their numbers to 0. I occasionally see one male at my house. He is very smart. I have had him in my sights three times. You never win this war, but most of the battles go well.
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Old 06-28-2010, 08:06 AM   #48
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fishlkmich View Post
The males help to establish territory and are usually responsible for the troubles that we have with HOSP. But, since the females reproduce, I count both as a job well done. Since I trap individuals, I have removed both males and females from nest boxes - rarely, the pair. I always remove nests when I place a trap. I keep good notes and it does not seem like abandonment or renesting is dictated by the sex of the HOSP removed. If you remove a female, the male will attempt to find a female that will accept "his" box. If you remove a male, there are plenty more looking for a female to pair with. She will normally want to nest in the same box with a new mate.

You may get frustrated, but you will get better. My site is full of HOSP every spring and at about this time of year I have always reduced their numbers to 0. I occasionally see one male at my house. He is very smart. I have had him in my sights three times. You never win this war, but most of the battles go well.
Two more females in the box this AM. They're still in there as I'm hoping they lure still more. That makes a total of five so far - all females. At this rate they won't be able to keep up and will become rare around here. Nevertheless, my neighbor's "Purple Martin" house will always be a lure for them, and I'm convinced this could be never ending...
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Old 06-29-2010, 01:28 AM   #49
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chipmunk Chipmunk problems

Yesterday I posted that I hoped this chipmunk had a memory so as to avoid the trap in the future. Seems he has devised a way to get his fill without danger - he's learned how to free himself! Today, after dispatching of three more females for a total of six in three days, I baited the trap again looking to realize still more success. When I went out an hour or so later, the bait was gone. The chipmunk had eaten it all!

This evening right at dusk, I baited the trap for the morning and put peanuts and a variety of larger seeds in a pile near the trap while the trap itself got only white millet. I'm hoping the chipmunk will be kept busy with the larger feed and leave the millet alone - at least for awhile.

This is one problem I hadn't anticipated...
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Old 06-29-2010, 06:36 AM   #50
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Sorry, but I think that's pretty funny, Jack! It's one of the benefits that we get from being close to nature. Your idea of placing preferred food near the trap should work well. Your new buddy should provide a sense of security for you targets, as well. Sounds like you are getting the hang of how to make that trap work for you - fantastic!
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