Wildlife Gardeners - North American Wildlife Gardening  

Go Back   Wildlife Gardeners - North American Wildlife Gardening > Wildlife Gardeners of North America Unite > Birds Including Raptors & Hummers

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 09-17-2009, 04:47 PM   #1
WG Staff
 
Staff's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Default Ten Ways to Help Migrating and Nesting Birds

Ten Ways to Help Migrating and Nesting Birds

http://www.savingbirds.org/habitat.html
excerpt from above:
Quote:
1. Use native plants: The most important thing you can do to help your feathered visitors is to incorporate as many native plantings in your yard as possible. Only native plants host the insect biomass required by our migrating and nesting birds. Many birds survive either largely or exclusively on insects, and virtually ALL nesting birds must have insects for their young. These insects provide necessary protein for nestling development.

Non-native plants host a fraction of the insects that area supported by native plants.

**NOTE: Use only plants native to your region. For more information about the relationship between native plants, insects and birds, read Bringing Nature Home by Douglas Tallamy.
__________________
The tendency of man's nature to good is like the tendency of water to flow downwards.
-Mencius
Staff is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-22-2009, 10:12 PM   #2
Unicellular Fungi
 
TheLorax's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Default

This site offered unique blueprints for birdhouse. Very nice.

They also have an article titled, "Costs of Chemophobia" which is very much worth taking the time to read.
__________________
"In the end we will conserve only what we love; we will love only what we understand; we will understand only what we have been taught."
-Baba Dioum, Senegalese ecologist
TheLorax is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-22-2009, 10:52 PM   #3
Official Plant Nerd
 
Equilibrium's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Default

Found the birdhouse, http://www.savingbirds.org/PDFs/BlueBirdHouse.pdf I've never seen this design in use anywhere.
__________________
"Be who you are and say what you feel, because those who mind don't matter and those who matter don't mind."
- Dr. Seuss
Equilibrium is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-2009, 07:28 PM   #4
Salamander
 
fishlkmich's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Default

I have been silent for much too long. It's not that I have not posted for a while. It's that I've kept my feelings to myself about one of the topics discussed on this forum - feeding birds.

I think that it's GREAT if you want to grow native plants, bury your bird feeders, scrub your bird bath with chlorine twice a day and buy organic mealworms to feed your bluebirds!!!

This latest link pushed me over the edge:
http://www.savingbirds.org/habitat.html

Excuse me, but:
"Also, do NOT offer jams or jellies to orioles. Yes, the birds love it, but it is unhealthy for them."
WTF??? Where do you get this? I have searched and searched. I will take the word of an "oriole expert" and The National Wildlife Federation over that of a no-name birding website, with no reference to back up their claims. Here you go:

"Orioles love grape jelly and many people feed it to them. But does this highly processed food harm the birds? “Jelly is bad only if it is left out too long,” says oriole expert Nancy Flood. “Bacterial populations can build up.” She encourages people to replace the jelly every day or two and clean the feeder thoroughly, using a mixture of one part liquid bleach to nine parts warm water."

Source:
Backyard Habitat - National Wildlife Magazine

Last winter I read about the pros and cons of feeding birds here. I remained silent. "They get diseases from being close and feeding from the same feeders". "Natural foods are available and better for them" . . .

My opinion is that starvation is not preferable to "possible problems" caused by feeding birds. You can do as you please, but don't ask me to stop feeding birds. Chances are that I know a little more than you do about birds. Since this oriole falsehood showed up I decided to nip the subject in the bud early in the season.

Saving Birds Thru Habitat is wrong and so is every article about the "Curse of the bird feeder". I have some excellent, first hand, experiences about the advantages of feeding birds. My experiences may not be typical, but they apply to every species of bird that some of us choose to feed.

I've ordered my suet for this winter and I'll get some fresh grape jelly in the spring to feed orioles. For those that don't care to feed birds - more power to ya! I get a bit ornery when somebody tells me that what I do is wrong, especially when they know less than I do.
__________________
www.michiganmartins.com
fishlkmich is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-23-2009, 09:27 PM   #5
Unicellular Fungi
 
TheLorax's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Default

We have 10 bird feeders. We begin feeding in October and continue through spring. All of our birdfeeders are sanitized regularly as are our birdbaths. We follow Cornell University's guidelines on sanitization of birdfeeders and birdbaths. The suet we offer is homemade. We have two hummingbird feeders and three oriole feeders. Those are sanitized regularly also. We use orange slices and grape jelly exclusively. We plant native species to feed birds that won't visit birdfeeders. Audubon had wonderful lists of the many birds that don't visit birdfeeders along with the plant species those birds rely upon for sustenance. There are also lists of species that support insects that most birds rely upon to feed their nestlings.

If we humans hadn't made such a mess of things with our love affair with all things exotic and ornamental and quick fixes, there would be no need for supplemental feeding. Where are you being told not to offer suet or grape jelly?
__________________
"In the end we will conserve only what we love; we will love only what we understand; we will understand only what we have been taught."
-Baba Dioum, Senegalese ecologist
TheLorax is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-24-2009, 12:25 AM   #6
Co-Administrator
 
Cirsium's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Midwest
Default

I too, feed birds (BOS and suet in the winter, Jelly early in the spring, and hummingbird feeders all summer). The Cornell Lab of Ornithology is also what I use as my feeding guide:
Suet and Other Foods, Birding Basics, All About Birds, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
__________________
"We abuse land because we regard it as a commodity belonging to us.
When we see land as a community to which we belong, we may begin to use it with love and respect."
Aldo Leopold

Cirsium is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-24-2009, 01:18 AM   #7
Official Plant Nerd
 
Equilibrium's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Default

I feed birds. I have at least 15 feeders. Some of them have spikes to add apple and other fruit slices. Others have trays for earthworms. I make my own suet too using the lowest sodium peanut butter that can be bought. We keep a wand in our birdbath to make sure an open source of water is available through winter. Native plants... you bet... nice link you posted to NWF's Backyard Habitat. I know there is some concern about jelly containing high fructose corn syrup but the biggest concern is people slopping out a half a jar at a time then some birds begin bringing their young to the feeders. The mixture of bleach that expert you quoted recommended of about 10% to clean feeders is what I use on my feeders and birdbaths. I'm lost about who told you not to let your orioles have jelly? I swear I did a search for "Also, do NOT offer jams or jellies to orioles. Yes, the birds love it, but it is unhealthy for them." and couldn't find it anywhere but in this thread. If somebody did, maybe they thought twice about it and edited it so it's gone now??? If they were hung up on the high fructose corn syrup... they're entitled to their opinion but it sounds more like somebody was hung up on birders leaving out large globs for days on end when it's 100F in the shade then slopping more in without cleaning the feeders. Jelly can go bad.
__________________
"Be who you are and say what you feel, because those who mind don't matter and those who matter don't mind."
- Dr. Seuss
Equilibrium is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-24-2009, 01:40 AM   #8
Slapping, Swearing, Itching, Scratching Mosquito Bait
 
swamp thing's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: pennsylvania,usa
Default

The jelly reference was number ten in the saving birds.org link in the first post - there was no mention of why it might be "unhealthy".

fishlkmich, the staff posts will keep you on your toes, at least they do to me - some of them are controversial or even creepy, not necessarily gospel advice... I hope you don't hesitate to tell us what you think next time.
swamp thing is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-24-2009, 01:57 AM   #9
Official Plant Nerd
 
Equilibrium's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Default

Ugh. I see it now. Thanks swamp thing and sorry fishlkmich. If they're going to make a statement like that putting the word NOT in caps they should back it up with why don't you think? I do think native fruiting plants high in lipids are important for migrating birds but they didn't go into any detail on that... they just said plant native plants and read Tallamy's book and left it at that. I did like #6 at that site but then I would. I'm still curious about the strange looking birdhouse plans.
__________________
"Be who you are and say what you feel, because those who mind don't matter and those who matter don't mind."
- Dr. Seuss
Equilibrium is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-24-2009, 02:28 AM   #10
Slapping, Swearing, Itching, Scratching Mosquito Bait
 
swamp thing's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: pennsylvania,usa
Default

My fave was #9:

Quote:
Domestic and feral cars kill many millions of birds annually.
At least none of the feral car companies needed a bailout!
swamp thing is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
backyard habitat, bird, bird feeders, bird habitat, bird houses, bird species, birds, feeding birds, insect biomass, insects, migrating, migrating birds, national wildlife magazine, native plants, native plants for birds, nesting, nesting birds, ten, ways

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:05 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2