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Old 09-24-2009, 10:45 AM   #11
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Sorry, but I've had the "crud" (H1N1 or the plague) and I work for the State of Michigan (possible state shutdown and have to work with ), so I haven't been in a good mood lately.

That oriole bit just got me bent! If they had printed "don't feed jam" in all caps I'd have sent a thank you letter. Telling me that I can't feed grape jelly, with no source telling me why, just makes my temperature go up and that's the last thing I need right now.

The anti bird feeding movement seems to be gaining strength. I know of thousands of adult purple martins that would have been happy to have some food to give to their young this past summer, instead of watching them die of starvation. We have manipulated our environment to suit us, not nature. There is a place for helping the things that we have not yet destroyed.

I'm going to take some meds now and hope that our legislature doesn't decide to work until 6:00 AM. I promise to take my wrath elsewhere for a while.

ST - feral cars - missed it - Thanks! I needed that! What a hoot!
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Old 09-26-2009, 01:20 PM   #12
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The plague... I'd send you some tylenol but you're beyond that. The anti-bird feeding movement spun out of control. It's like everyone is being shamed into not feeding. Everything is black and white and there's no grey area. Entire PM populations would be dead dead dead if it wasn't for supplemental feeding. That should be given equal time in discussions of providing feed to birds. So if I go bury my birdfeeders will you make me new ones?
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Old 05-04-2015, 12:29 PM   #13
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I guess I'll just bump this thread, instead of starting a new one, since it matches the topic. Just today, I set out the jelly (without corn syrup) for the Orioles, and here comes a male Baltimore. YAY! So I am not against feeding the birds. But I have been thinking about what I have been doing, is it helping? Is it hurting?

What got me thinking more about it, is on a birding forum I belong to, someone mentioned adding powdered calcium to the mealworms they put out. The reason being plain mealworms do not provide the calcium needed for the young Bluebirds to develop properly. I do a quick search and this link was near the top.
A Word of Caution

Quote:
She (Julie Zickefoose) points out that mealworms are not a nutritious food source for birds. They are low in phosphorus and high in fat. Some people add vitamins to the mealworm dish to provide needed nutrition. ... too many well-meaning people think they are “saving” bluebirds by feeding them mealworms year round. This only makes the birds lazy by giving them an easy handout. ... Mealworms are a great emergency food in case of steady rain and cold in the nesting season, or ice storms in winter, but should not be fed all spring and summer.
When I bring up concerns, it falls on deaf ears. Basically I say, put away the meal worms for the breeding season and take advantage of the birds by allowing them to eat the pest bugs in your yard and garden.

I feed the dried mealworms in the early spring, when the Robins return, and when our ground is still rock hard. It was so neat when the Western Meadowlarks came by to eat them. Other species have eaten it, as well. I have a block of mealworms and sunflower pieces and was going to let that get eaten down. It seems one Robin is not eating anything else, so I'll bring it in the next time I go out. I cannot count how many times I see him at it and am afraid he might feed it to the young which soon should hatch.

What are your thoughts on mealworms?
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Old 05-05-2015, 12:55 PM   #14
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Quote:
someone mentioned adding powdered calcium to the meal-worms they put out
There are calcium based powders you can sprinkle over the dried worms but there are also calcium based FOODS that you can give to your live meal-worms to ingest previous to putting them out as food for the birds. Most of the larger pet stores keep it in stock as it is a nutritional requirement for lizards and turtles and the like.
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Old 05-08-2015, 08:46 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Birding Bunch View Post
I guess I'll just bump this thread, instead of starting a new one, since it matches the topic. Just today, I set out the jelly (without corn syrup) for the Orioles, and here comes a male Baltimore. YAY! So I am not against feeding the birds. But I have been thinking about what I have been doing, is it helping? Is it hurting?

What got me thinking more about it, is on a birding forum I belong to, someone mentioned adding powdered calcium to the mealworms they put out. The reason being plain mealworms do not provide the calcium needed for the young Bluebirds to develop properly. I do a quick search and this link was near the top.
A Word of Caution

When I bring up concerns, it falls on deaf ears...

What are your thoughts on mealworms?
I think you make valid points.

I've never fed my bluebirds meal worms...and they have nested here every year with at least two broods each summer. (I was just a little concerned they wouldn't return this year after our harsh winter, but they are back and there are five eggs in their favorite nest box!)
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Old 05-08-2015, 09:40 PM   #16
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Originally Posted by dapjwy View Post
I think you make valid points.

I've never fed my bluebirds meal worms...and they have nested here every year with at least two broods each summer. (I was just a little concerned they wouldn't return this year after our harsh winter, but they are back and there are five eggs in their favorite nest box!)
That must be exciting for you, Dap. I'm jealous, as I'll not, it seems, ever have bluebirds here again with the English Sparrow here being what it is. Will you be posting pictures of the fledging chicks??
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