Wildlife Gardeners - North American Wildlife Gardening  

Go Back   Wildlife Gardeners - North American Wildlife Gardening > Wildlife Gardeners of North America Unite > Birds Including Raptors & Hummers

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 08-11-2009, 05:41 PM   #1
Heron
 
milkweed's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Indiana
Default Carolina Parakeet

The Carolina Parakeet died out because of a number of different threats. To make space for more agricultural land, large areas of forest were cut down, taking away its habitat. The colorful feathers (green body, yellow head, and red around the bill) were in demand as decorations in ladies' hats, and the birds were kept as pets. Even though the birds bred easily in captivity, little was done by owners to increase the population of tamed birds. Finally, they were killed in large numbers because farmers considered them a pest, although many farmers valued them for controlling invasive cockleburs. It has also been hypothesized that the introduced honeybee helped contribute to its extinction by taking many of the bird's nesting sites.[3]
A factor that contributed to their extinction was the unfortunate flocking behavior that led them to return immediately to a location where some of the birds had just been killed. This led to even more being shot by hunters as they gathered about the wounded and dead members of the flock.

This combination of factors extirpated the species from most of its range until the early years of the 20th century. However, the last populations were not much hunted for food or feathers, nor did the farmers in rural Florida consider them a pest as the benefit of the birds' love of cockleburs clearly outweighed the minor damage they did to the small-scale garden plots. The final extinction of the species is somewhat of a mystery, but the most likely cause seems to be that the birds succumbed to poultry disease, as suggested by the rapid disappearance of the last, small, but apparently healthy and reproducing flocks of these highly social birds. If this is true, the very fact that the Carolina Parakeet was finally tolerated to roam in the vicinity of human settlements proved its undoing (Snyder & Russell, 2002).
The Louisiana subspecies of the Carolina Parakeet, C. c. ludovicianus,[4] was slightly different in color to the parent species, being more bluish-green and generally of a somewhat subdued coloration, and went extinct in much the same way, but at a somewhat earlier date (early 1910s). The Appalachian Mountains separated these birds from the eastern C. c. carolinensis

Carolina Parakeet - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
__________________
We do not inherit the land from our fathers, we borrow it from our children.
milkweed is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2009, 05:45 PM   #2
Heron
 
milkweed's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Indiana
Default

Quote:
Do not imagine, reader, that all these outrages are borne without severe retaliation on the part of the planters. So far from this, the Parakeets are destroyed in great numbers, for whilst busily engaged in plucking off the fruits or tearing the grain from the stacks, the husbandman approaches them with perfect ease, and commits great slaughter among them. All the survivors rise, shriek, fly round about for a few minutes, and again alight on the very place of most imminent danger. The gun is kept at work; eight or ten, or even twenty, are killed at every discharge. The living birds, as if conscious of the death of their companions, sweep over their bodies, screaming as loud as ever, but still return to the stack to be shot at, until so few remain alive, that the farmer does not consider it worth his while to spend more of his ammunition. I have seen several hundreds destroyed in this manner in the course of a few hours, and have procured a basketful of these birds at a few shots, in order to make choice of good specimens for drawing the figures by which this species is represented in the plate now under your consideration.
The Carolina Parrot
__________________
We do not inherit the land from our fathers, we borrow it from our children.
milkweed is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-12-2009, 03:58 PM   #3
Fox
 
MaggyNoLia's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: South Carolina
Default

I too have read about the Carolina Parakeets. My oldest daughter and a friend of hers have both done a painting of the parakeets in a Magnolia tree. It's a shame that such colorful and beautiful birds fell at the hands of men. Can you imagine how nice it would be to look out into your tree and see the rainbow of colors they would bring?
MaggyNoLia is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-27-2018, 11:48 PM   #4
Salamander
 
KC Clark's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Central Ohio
Default

I always figured the last Carolina parakeet died out in the 1800s. Was very surprised when I found out yesterday that it was in 1918. Also surprised that the last one was in the Cincinnati Zoo. I've been there. I remember a display about them having the last passenger pigeon in 1914. Don't remember seeing anything about the Carolina parakeet.

Unlocking secrets from extinct species stored at Ohio State - News - The Columbus Dispatch - Columbus, OH
__________________

The caterpillar does all the work but the butterfly gets all the publicity.

George Carlin
KC Clark is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
bird extinction, bird habitat, carolina, carolina parakeet, carolina parakeet habitat, extinct species, extinction, habit degradation, habitat changes, habitat destruction, parakeet

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:38 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2