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Old 09-07-2015, 03:45 PM   #1
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Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: New Jersey
Default will migratory bird act help? just in case.

We have new neighbors who are very busy with a chain saw at the moment. We have a row of large shrubs separating our properties (I'm not sure of the exact line yet) on the border and every year but one for at least the last ten years we have catbirds nesting in one of these shrubs. I saw a catbird today but I'm guessing it's pasting nesting season and that would mean the nest isn't being used.

I don't know if these shrubs are ones they plan on removing or not but I'm getting a little nervous.

If people know (even if it's what I suspect and don't entirely want to hear) please let me know.

Thanks. -- Lori
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Old 09-08-2015, 03:23 PM   #2
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Originally Posted by loris View Post
We have new neighbors who are very busy with a chain saw at the moment. We have a row of large shrubs separating our properties (I'm not sure of the exact line yet) on the border and every year but one for at least the last ten years we have catbirds nesting in one of these shrubs. I saw a catbird today but I'm guessing it's pasting nesting season and that would mean the nest isn't being used.

I don't know if these shrubs are ones they plan on removing or not but I'm getting a little nervous.

If people know (even if it's what I suspect and don't entirely want to hear) please let me know.

Thanks. -- Lori
Since nesting season is over, they wouldn't be harming an active nest, so they could remove those shrubs. However, you should find out where the property line is. Also suggest to them that unless they know exactly where it is, they shouldn't be cutting down the shrubs, since they might be on your property. At the very least, if it turns out to not be on your side of the property line, you could always plant shrubs on your side to replace the ones that were cut down.
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Old 09-09-2015, 11:31 PM   #3
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Thanks gymell. I think/hope they're done trimming near those shrubs and they're mostly still there.

It's also good to have the clarification on the act in case I come across something like this again.
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Old 09-11-2015, 09:22 AM   #4
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I think/hope they're done trimming
You think....You hope...
If it was one of my neighbors.... I'd be walking out there and introducing myself to them and flat out ask them,,,,, if they were thinking about removing any of the bushes between you two and if they where, if they knew where the lot line was and who bushes they actually are as once they are cut, they're cut and then it's too late for thinking, hoping, saving!

If the bushes are by chance located on their side. I'd then go on and mention how much they are used by the wildlife, how they provide privacy, how enjoyable and pretty they are when coated in glistening ice and so on.
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