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Old 03-14-2014, 10:01 PM   #11
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The coolest spring sign I've seen yet was hundreds of wood frogs mating and two spotted salamanders heading down to a vernal pool at a nature center near my house.
That sounds really cool. Lucky you witnessed it.

I had to check out your location, because we are nowhere near ready for rating frogs yet.
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Old 03-15-2014, 01:37 AM   #12
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This makes me want to look into mountain ash.

The other day I saw at least a dozen robins in the yard. I know they can overwinter; I learned that from my 9th grade Biology teacher...so I'm still looking for the first red-wing blackbird to show up as my true sign of spring.
There appear to be two mountain ash species that are native to PA:
Plants Profile for Sorbus americana (American mountain ash)
Plants Profile for Sorbus decora (Northern mountain ash)
They are nice plants for both their fruit and foliage.

My first big sign of spring is the arrival of the sandhill cranes. They have already been reported in southern Wisconsin, and I expect to hear those haunting calls any day now.
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Old 03-15-2014, 08:57 AM   #13
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There appear to be two mountain ash species that are native to PA:
Plants Profile for Sorbus americana (American mountain ash)
Plants Profile for Sorbus decora (Northern mountain ash)
They are nice plants for both their fruit and foliage.

My first big sign of spring is the arrival of the sandhill cranes. They have already been reported in southern Wisconsin, and I expect to hear those haunting calls any day now.
Thanks, NEWisc! Cool to see that there are two species to choose from--or, maybe get both. You've got me started on researching.

The "haunting calls" sound intriguing.
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Old 03-15-2014, 09:18 AM   #14
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I found this site while trying to see what grows with mountain ash: North American boreal and western temperate forest vegetation [04_18]

I've become more and more interested in finding companion plants that naturally grow together.
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Old 03-15-2014, 01:21 PM   #15
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I found this site while trying to see what grows with mountain ash: North American boreal and western temperate forest vegetation [04_18]

I've become more and more interested in finding companion plants that naturally grow together.
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I expect "my" red wings to show up anytime now.



~smile~. Funny.

I had no idea that gulls weren't around year round.
It must depend on how far north they are. The laughing gulls on the Outer Banks of North Carolina over winter there, maybe some of Arey's from New Jersey come down and join them.
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Old 03-16-2014, 08:52 AM   #16
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I Here at the shore the official announcement of spring for me is a laughing gull standing on top of a telephone pole, shouting "I'm B-A-A-A-A-C-K"! for the whole neighborhood to hear.
Great capture or should I say way of writing exactly how they sound.
I've often told Hubby they were out there teasing the dog again. Circling around and laughing at her. Ha ha ha ha ha...

There's quite a difference in their calls depending upon what they see or want. Persssssew PersssssewPerssssew is another you often hear them using when they are on the hunt. That's the call I myself use to call them in when I'm tossing scraps for them to.... purssssue.
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Old 03-12-2015, 03:52 PM   #17
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Frequently Asked Questions about Robins: Wintering-dscf7082.jpg

Frequently Asked Questions about Robins: Wintering-dscf7086.jpg
Cant' wait for their return!
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Old 03-15-2015, 06:43 AM   #18
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Attachment 42260

Attachment 42261
Cant' wait for their return!
I saw my first yesterday.

I know they can and do overwinter...but, until I get enough mature trees and shrubs whose fruit persists, I don't have enough to support them.

Frequently Asked Questions about Robins: Wintering-2015-03-14-09.35.40.jpg
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Old 03-23-2015, 02:44 PM   #19
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We occasionally have Robins all winter, but if anything, they take advantage of the bird bath. This year we didn't see them until end of February, or so. They got along. A sign of spring here is not when they arrive, but when they start fighting. Have you ever seen a Robin battle? They can get fierce.
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Old 03-24-2015, 06:10 AM   #20
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We occasionally have Robins all winter, but if anything, they take advantage of the bird bath. This year we didn't see them until end of February, or so. They got along. A sign of spring here is not when they arrive, but when they start fighting. Have you ever seen a Robin battle? They can get fierce.
Thanks for sharing, Birding Bunch. I'm always looking for another sign of spring to watch for.

last week, I spotted one robin, a few days later three, yesterday, while walking the yard a small flock...no fighting yet.

I usually notice male mourning doves getting g iridescent...and getting amorous following and nudging a female.

I was thrilled to see a small flock of red-winged blackbirds recently...I'm enjoying their visits to our yard for seed.
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