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Old 02-17-2014, 08:45 PM   #11
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I'm working on my list now since I planted some dogwood bushes, spicebushes, and hazelnuts last year.

Also last year I planted some Tulip Trees and Hawthornes

I have some space for some Indian Currant, Arrow wood Viburnum, Service Berry and Virginia Creeper.

The biggest job will be the trellis for the Virginia Creeper and since I'll order all my Natives from Cold stream planting them in one day

I've seen people with Eyes bigger than their shovels and they struggle to get everything planted or just give up and let the leaves drop.

I planted an Arrow wood Viburnum too close to the stop sign and will have to transplant that Again
It sounds like you've got a good selection and are adding even more! Great to hear.

I don't even know what an Indian currant is.

I know what you mean about transplanting things. I put in three hazelnut seedlings years ago, and sited one of them along a bank near the road. A year or two later, I found that the road crew cut everything down (strange, looking back, it only happened once so far). Anyway, I decided to move it after that. Unfortunately where I put it too near a black walnut tree in the hedgerow...only to find out a year or two later that they are not compatible and the hazelnut would be stunted if it survived. I moved it again last year--the poor thing looks like it is five years behind its "brothers"!

As for planting them all in one day...you could take the David way-- I mean the lazy way out: when I bought 75 seedlings (if memory serves I had three species each coming in a bundle of 25), I planted a few where I knew I wanted them (and had places prepared), shared a few, and then put the rest in a huge pot of potting soil and let them grow there until I was ready for them. Of course the hemlocks I did that with had terribly entangled roots by the time I got to them. Still, all in all, not a bad way of dealing with "eyes too big for my shovel".
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Going by some of the birds you've posted Dapjwy your doing a good job on attracting them
Thanks, sprucetree. I'm trying. I'm sure the fact that there are woodland around this country setting helps...but surely when I get the habitat as I envision it, this place should be a haven for a large variety of species. ~warm smile~ just thinking about it.
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Old 02-17-2014, 09:43 PM   #12
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Did any of you look at the world map of people posting to the GBBC?
http://ebird.org/ebird/gbbc/livesubs

It is odd. There are lots of folks in southern India, but very few in northern India or in China. Lots in Portugal, few in central Europe. A bunch in Kenya, but the rest of Africa is pretty scant. It would be interesting to know how they publicize the count in the rest of the world and if it is all word of mouth that determines this odd distribution or some other factor.
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Old 02-17-2014, 09:59 PM   #13
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Did any of you look at the world map of people posting to the GBBC?
http://ebird.org/ebird/gbbc/livesubs

It is odd. There are lots of folks in southern India, but very few in northern India or in China. Lots in Portugal, few in central Europe. A bunch in Kenya, but the rest of Africa is pretty scant. It would be interesting to know how they publicize the count in the rest of the world and if it is all word of mouth that determines this odd distribution or some other factor.
Thanks for sharing. I would never have seen the map if you didn't. Interesting.

Good question.
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Old 02-17-2014, 10:06 PM   #14
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I think it may have something to do with lack of internet access that's my theory anyway
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Old 02-17-2014, 10:12 PM   #15
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Did you see where you can see how you rank as far as species reported in your county and state! I thought that was pretty cool!

http://ebird.org/ebird/gbbc/places
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Old 02-17-2014, 10:42 PM   #16
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I think it may have something to do with lack of internet access that's my theory anyway
That makes a whole lotta sense.

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Originally Posted by recurve View Post
Did you see where you can see how you rank as far as species reported in your county and state! I thought that was pretty cool!

http://ebird.org/ebird/gbbc/places
Nope...but you can bet I'm gonna check it out. Thanks, recurve.
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Old 02-18-2014, 06:06 PM   #17
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Sorry about not IDing Indian Currant dapjwy: It's also called Coral berry

This is from a blog by a person who sells it:

Also known as devil's shoestring it sends out shoots which root readily. Kinda sounds like lilac but only gets 4 feet tall.
Raspberry colored fruit persist all winter and small mammals will only eat them as a last resort. Robins and Quail eat the pinkish-purple fruit and deer will readily browse it.

It's red fall color is striking but the green flowers, While attracting pollinators are in-conspicuous. The bark is very distinctive and also has a purple hue.

A host plant for clear wing hawk moth
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Old 02-18-2014, 08:57 PM   #18
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Thanks, sprucetree. I'm not familiar with it, but just did a quick search. At least one site lists it as native to PA. I'll look into it more deeply before I decide.
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Old 02-19-2014, 09:36 PM   #19
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Coral berry is beautiful. My soil is too dry for it but it grows around here, especially in areas with diabase/alkaline soil.
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Old 02-21-2014, 12:24 PM   #20
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Here are some results from last weekends Great backyard bird count!

GBBC eNews: Record Number of Countries Join Bird Count (Correction)

"In North America, California sits atop the leader board with the most checklists and the greatest number of species so far, but New York is nipping at its heels for the checklist record. Ontario, Canada, has jumped into the top 10 for checklists, outdistancing even big birdy states such as Texas, Florida, and North Carolina.

State/Province Number of Species Number of Checklists
California 358 8,472
New York 165 7,663
Pennsylvania 136 6,945
Ontario 146 6,329
Texas 350 5,526
Florida 307 5,376
Ohio 137 5,214
Virginia 179 4,883
North Carolina 194 4,876
Michigan 127 4,000
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