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Old 06-12-2012, 06:52 PM   #1
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When I see movement in a tree at a distance and have the camera in hand, I often zoom in from across the yard and take some pictures. They are rarely perfectly focused, but normally allow me to identify what I couldn't see with the naked eye. This time, however, I don't recognize this little fella (lady?).

Any ideas what it could be?

I know what I'm hoping it might be, but I'm really not sure.
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Old 06-12-2012, 10:29 PM   #2
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My first guess is that it looks like a female American Redstart. Except, is that a black spot on its chest? I couldn't tell clearly from the picture. If it is, it would not be a redstart. What are you hoping that it is?
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Old 06-12-2012, 10:36 PM   #3
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Sure looks like a female restart to me, but as Bee said, hard to tell what that spot is with the distance issue.
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Old 06-12-2012, 10:39 PM   #4
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Part of me wondered if it were a newly fledged Northern oriole...but, while searching for it, I spotted the American redstart...so, I'd be thrilled with that too--interesting that you think it is a possibility too. My third choice is another bird I've never encountered before (American redstart is one of them). Too bad it is not a clearer picture.

Thanks for the response.
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Old 06-12-2012, 10:41 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by disuhan View Post
Sure looks like a female restart to me, but as Bee said, hard to tell what that spot is with the distance issue.
It does look like there is some kind of marking on the breast. Even if it isn't a redstart, I've learned a new bird and will read up more on it.

Hopefully more people will respond...does it look like anything else?

If I get another--clearer shot of it, I'll be sure to post it.
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Old 06-12-2012, 10:47 PM   #6
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I'd say it's probably some species of warbler. Even as a young one, it doesn't have the right shape for an oriole, but it's an interesting idea. I'm not great at IDing fledglings/juveniles.
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Old 06-12-2012, 10:53 PM   #7
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Maybe I shouldn't venture this far without a clearer image, but I think the beak looks very "warbler-like" and not so much oriole-like. But female and fledgling warblers can be so tricky to identify. The thing that stood out to me from the photo are the yellow/orange color at the base of the wings, and the one wing bar that also appears yellowish. But the black patch is confusing! I'm just wondering what else it could be? Hopefully someone else will chime in here.
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Old 06-12-2012, 11:01 PM   #8
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I read up on them a little, and I'm wondering if it is an immature male that would look similar to a female...I think that could explain the dark markings developing (perhaps).

Another thing occurred to me: the other day I saw what I thought was a Northern oriole pursuing and pecking a crow in flight. Now I'm wondering if it were not a redstart--it all happened so quickly and it didn't *quite* remind me of an oriole.

Also, the habitat they inhabit (
Quote:
Moist second growth deciduous forest, with abundant shrubs.
) is a fairly good description of, if not our own immediate property, our area. I am working on improving the woodland areas on our land as well as the meadow areas...so, hopefully I will have some very attractive nesting sites for a variety of birds.

I'll keep my eyes open for more American redstart sightings.

(I still hope I have orioles as well.)
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Old 06-12-2012, 11:07 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BeeWonderful View Post
Maybe I shouldn't venture this far without a clearer image, but I think the beak looks very "warbler-like" and not so much oriole-like. But female and fledgling warblers can be so tricky to identify. The thing that stood out to me from the photo are the yellow/orange color at the base of the wings, and the one wing bar that also appears yellowish. But the black patch is confusing! I'm just wondering what else it could be? Hopefully someone else will chime in here.

I think it is a redstart! Yay!

I'm getting really excited...not only because I've spotted a bird, I've never seen before (nor even heard of), but also because I will likely see many other species I may have only seen pictured in field guides. The more I improve our habitat, the more diversity I expect to see--and document.

I really have to get a water feature established so that I can see birds that don't come to feeders...then I'll have a good idea of what we already have...and see what else I can attract!
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Old 06-13-2012, 07:17 AM   #10
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You might be on to something with that juvenile male redstart. Congrats on seeing a new bird!
I had a palm warbler come to my new pond during migration - I was floored! As if you needed any more incentive to build it, you'll definitely see tons of things you wouldn't otherwise!
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american redstart, bird, bird call, bird id, bird songs, bird sound, bird species, bird watching, birds, call, cedar waxwings, female, ideas, identification, identify, redstarts, song, sound, watching, waxwings

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