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Old 06-10-2012, 08:44 AM   #11
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"Well, Tuesday was our last day spotting any hummies. Should we just take down the feeder for the summer, putting it back up at migration or keep changing it out? I am not as familiar with these birds." Tough call. If you keep it up while you're working on adding more natives.... I'd move it into the shade and change out the sugar water at least every other day bleaching then rinsing the feeder before refilling it. We put out the feeders in spring and again in fall these days for our hummers. We had a problem with ants that left me rubbing lemon slices up and down the poles a whole season and that combined with keeping em cleaned and refilled during the dog days of summer was too much work for me. The other deal is that I’m a little farther along providing “natural” feed for the few that fly through than you are. Most folk I know leave em out the whole season increasing the sugar to water ratio in fall.
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Old 06-10-2012, 09:57 AM   #12
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Yes, I agree on the jewelweed. Last year I moved some from way back where it is still, to my shame, adulterated with the likes of multiflora rose, etc and I dug up a few plants of jewel weed, making sure to water it diligently. Well, though I heard it reproduced at a prodigious rate, I never expected what I have found this year - entire swaths of the hedgerow are lined on the ground with jewelweed.
I'm amazed that you were able to transplant it, it doesn't take well to moving, 'though, I guess I have moved one or two with success when they were still young. Normally, I just collect the seeds and throw them on the ground where I want them.

I read, years ago, that jewelweed was all the rage in England. Sigh, now I'm thinking about how are natives are wreaking havoc in other parts of the world (not necessarily jewelweed).

As for it being prolific, it certainly is, but it pulls up very easily, and being an annual, if you get them all before they go to seed, you can eradicate them in one season--not that we'd want to!
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Old 06-10-2012, 10:03 PM   #13
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As others have said, growing Lonicera definitely brings them to your garden. Yesterday I watched one at the lonicera, and when it was finished, it flew over to my peas growing up the trellis and proceeded to feed at those too! Who knew, hummingbirds visiting pea flowers!
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Old 06-10-2012, 10:33 PM   #14
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As others have said, growing Lonicera definitely brings them to your garden. Yesterday I watched one at the lonicera, and when it was finished, it flew over to my peas growing up the trellis and proceeded to feed at those too! Who knew, hummingbirds visiting pea flowers!
I can't wait until my Lonicera blooms and draws them in.

How cool about the peas! There is a thread somewhere asking what you've actually witnessed hummers going to. Maybe you can post there as well. I just found it: Plants that attract Humming birds
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Old 06-11-2012, 07:52 AM   #15
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Jewelweed also can be used to prevent or even stop poison Ivy rash. I've used it and it works!
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Old 06-11-2012, 08:20 AM   #16
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Jewelweed also can be used to prevent or even stop poison Ivy rash. I've used it and it works!
I've tried that, but aside from soothing it a little, I'm not sure it really helps to cure it. I never used to get poison ivy; now I do.

Are there any studies out there that prove that jewelweed is effective against poison ivy, or is it an old wives' tale?
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Old 06-11-2012, 10:36 AM   #17
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I can't wait until my Lonicera blooms and draws them in.

How cool about the peas! There is a thread somewhere asking what you've actually witnessed hummers going to. Maybe you can post there as well. I just found it: Plants that attract Humming birds
thanks for pointing that out!
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Old 06-11-2012, 11:39 AM   #18
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thanks for pointing that out!
No problem. A lot of the old threads should probably be revived.
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Old 06-15-2012, 05:46 PM   #19
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"I never used to get poison ivy; now I do." Try Tecnu. You can get it at just about any pharmacy and most grocery stores even carry it at this time of year. It won't cure it but it'll sure reduce your discomfort if you can use it soon as you realize you got into poison ivy, oak, or sumac.
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"Are there any studies out there that prove that jewelweed is effective against poison ivy, or is it an old wives' tale?" Old wives tale. You can do a search yourself for Toxicodendron dermatitis but most of the research is in line with this, Treatment of poison ivy/oak allergic con... [Am J Contact Dermat. 1997] - PubMed - NCBI.
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Old 06-15-2012, 09:23 PM   #20
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"I never used to get poison ivy; now I do." Try Tecnu. You can get it at just about any pharmacy and most grocery stores even carry it at this time of year. It won't cure it but it'll sure reduce your discomfort if you can use it soon as you realize you got into poison ivy, oak, or sumac.
--
Thanks, I'll check back here if I get it again...for now I'm just avoiding it...although I have a couple *small* starts that I'm going to have to deal with. I'll be sure to wear gloves or something.

I read that washing first with rubbing alcohol first then soap and water shortly after exposure is effective. Last time I had potential contact, I did that and never got it. The idea is that soap and water spreads the oil around, but the alcohol will remove it, I guess.

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"Are there any studies out there that prove that jewelweed is effective against poison ivy, or is it an old wives' tale?" Old wives tale. You can do a search yourself for Toxicodendron dermatitis but most of the research is in line with this, Treatment of poison ivy/oak allergic con... [Am J Contact Dermat. 1997] - PubMed - NCBI.
I thought so.

Too bad.
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bird, bird feeder, birds, clethra, disappearing, feeder, honeysuckle, hummers, hummies, hummingbird, hummingbirds, liatris, monarda, native plants, plants

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