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Old 12-06-2011, 03:56 PM   #1
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Default A unique creature seen in a garden.

Until now I would have said the woodcock was unlikely to be seen in a garden. But it seems bird behavior varies between breeding and overwintering grounds. And some gardeners are exceptional at creating a diverse habitat.


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Old 12-08-2011, 08:54 PM   #2
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I love those little mud bats! They stop over in my yard in early spring usually only for a few days on their way north I hear them peenting at night and their courting flights are something to see.
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Old 12-08-2011, 09:09 PM   #3
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Cool.

I've only seen them in pictures--how cool would it be to attract them to one's yard,,,even if they were just passing through!
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Old 12-10-2011, 03:06 PM   #4
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Hmmmm....shrubby areas with lots of leaf litter and worms-I wonder if we'll get woodcocks someday.
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Old 12-10-2011, 03:20 PM   #5
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Hmmmm....shrubby areas with lots of leaf litter and worms-I wonder if we'll get woodcocks someday.

Me too.
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Old 12-10-2011, 08:56 PM   #6
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Woodcocks like to feed and loaf in shrubby areas during the day but roost and court (which is the real show) in open fields at night. They like lawns in spring chubby little convert shorebirds with stubby legs don't like thick ground cover. The land my property is on was converted from farmland to residential in the late 80's it has some of the right conditions to hold them for a little while but still not ideal habitat. Having a riparian habitat close by is also a plus. listen just after dark in late march early april on a damp night you might just get some stopping over.
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Old 12-12-2011, 05:36 PM   #7
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Woodcocks like to feed and loaf in shrubby areas during the day but roost and court (which is the real show) in open fields at night. They like lawns in spring chubby little convert shorebirds with stubby legs don't like thick ground cover. The land my property is on was converted from farmland to residential in the late 80's it has some of the right conditions to hold them for a little while but still not ideal habitat. Having a riparian habitat close by is also a plus. listen just after dark in late march early april on a damp night you might just get some stopping over.
Thanks, recurve. I didn't know much about them nor their habitat...I remember seeing them in a drawing or painting from PA Game News--I think I may have even tried drawing them at the time (as I did so many wildlife pictures in my early teens). I thought they were more woodland species.

Good to know that a raparian habitat would attract them...I *might* just get lucky...especially now that I know what to look (and listen) for. Only problem is that the local area is infiltrated by Japanese knotweed...so perhaps I was being a bit generous with the word "habitat".
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Old 12-12-2011, 05:56 PM   #8
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Pretty odd sounding bird. Listen to its vocals here: eNature: FieldGuides: Species Detail
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Old 12-12-2011, 09:45 PM   #9
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Only problem is that the local area is infiltrated by Japanese knotweed...so perhaps I was being a bit generous with the word "habitat".
Well the good thing is woodcock can't tell the diffrence between native and non-native plants. and from what I've seen of japanese knotweed it can make good woodcock nesting habitat particularly if its invading into a sapling sized hardwood stand. But still not a good enough reason to keep it around
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Old 12-13-2011, 05:08 PM   #10
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Quote:
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Well the good thing is woodcock can't tell the diffrence between native and non-native plants. and from what I've seen of japanese knotweed it can make good woodcock nesting habitat particularly if its invading into a sapling sized hardwood stand. But still not a good enough reason to keep it around
Glad to know *something* might be using it for shelter--the only thing I can think it might be good for...and I agree, not a good enough reason to keep it around...especially when there are native plants to provide shelter--and *so much more*!
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