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Old 09-02-2012, 02:38 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by TheLorax View Post
... attached please find a lower version of Equilibrium's word document.
Thanks, TheLorax.

Somehow I missed this until I saw your message today.

I read it and am a bit too frustrated to respond much. I feel like it is an obvious strawman argument...as one who considers himself a near-purist, I hardly expect everyone to follow my lead, am not foolish enough to believe we'd achieve a utopia of exclusively native plants, and I (and most people I would assume) include food crops in my yard (although, I am careful not to plant certain prolific herbs and such in a way that they could easily spread throughout the yard and beyond). The argument is not that plants will escape from one garden to the next; it is that things escape from the garden into natural areas--his focus is only on plants not on the animal species that depend on the native plants...not the entire system that we don't even understand. I'm furious about the continued comparison to being a xenophobe, anti-immigration nut. Anyone who knows me, knows that I most certainly am not.

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Former president of AHS and now president of Burpee?
Gee...he would have no reason to be biased, would he? <dripping with sarcasm>

~sigh~
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Last edited by dapjwy; 09-02-2012 at 02:40 PM. Reason: removing a random letter...and correcting a spelling error
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Old 09-02-2012, 07:17 PM   #12
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I read the short article and it's very compelling but non-natives need tender loving care and I'd rather lavish that on the natives. In most cases people like Ball who has spent his whole life studying horticulture nearly always take that stand and write articles like that. IMHO they are My-optic about plants.

But take people interested in other things like bird watching, butterfly identification, pond, prairie, or forest ecology and they'll be open about learning, understanding, and implementing native plants into the food web. Tallamey is a good example.

It's not like the roses, peonies, and Asian lilies are trouble-free either. If you read the problems gardeners have with the early/late blights, aphid infestations, Japanese grub attacks and different wilts and fungus's that attack non-natives you'd think twice.

Of course the story goes down-hill from there; The non-natives like Japanese maple and cherry are stunted by early frosts and the butterfly dies back to it's roots after a hard winter, All climate problems that could be eliminated by using natives.

Typically when a lawn is planted the grubs follow and the only answer the Expert can give is grub-x, Aphid invasion on the roses or peonies? Get some Sevin. Soon all the Praying Mantis and Lady Beetles are gone too.

By planting showy plants we've made our yards sterile except for the blights and wilts that seem un-effected along with the invasive and tree killing insects.
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Old 09-02-2012, 07:44 PM   #13
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Good points, sprucetree.

I know we are preaching to the choir here.

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Originally Posted by sprucetree View Post
...In most cases people like Ball who has spent his whole life studying horticulture nearly always take that stand and write articles like that...But take people interested in other things like bird watching, butterfly identification, pond, prairie, or forest ecology and they'll be open about learning, understanding, and implementing native plants into the food web.
Thank you for that...it makes sense and gives me some hope.
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