Wildlife Gardeners - North American Wildlife Gardening  

Go Back   Wildlife Gardeners - North American Wildlife Gardening > Wildlife Gardeners of North America Unite > Biodiversity

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 05-23-2011, 09:38 AM   #11
Grub
 
papercarver's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Newbury, Massachusetts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jack View Post
It's a great plant and, unlike the chokecherry, is not rabbit candy in the winter months - at least I've not had to protect the plants as I recommend you protect those chokecherries you say you have.
I have one chokeBERRY (aronia arbutifolia) and have seen no rabbit damage in the past three years. They sampled my beach plums (prunus maritima) the first year the plants were in, but have subsequently left them alone - it probably doesn't hurt that they are in a location close to the road and more exposed.

For some reason our resident deer herd has disappeared; none of my neighbors have seen the deer since last fall. All the winter shrub damage seems to have been rabbit-generated (albeit at deer height given the size of the snowdrifts!).
papercarver is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-23-2011, 10:12 AM   #12
Great Horned Owl
 
jack's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Northeastern MA
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by papercarver View Post
I have one chokeBERRY (aronia arbutifolia) and have seen no rabbit damage in the past three years. They sampled my beach plums (prunus maritima) the first year the plants were in, but have subsequently left them alone - it probably doesn't hurt that they are in a location close to the road and more exposed.

For some reason our resident deer herd has disappeared; none of my neighbors have seen the deer since last fall. All the winter shrub damage seems to have been rabbit-generated (albeit at deer height given the size of the snowdrifts!).
Hah, the tough winter made the deer susceptible to the resident coyote packs. They became weakened in the snow, and the coyote, much like the wolf, takes advantage of weakened herbivores in such winters. I've not seen a deer here since the winter either. Good riddance!!

The rabbits, well, that's another story. I need to get a fox family started in my brush pile, but I fear the coyote numbers that pass through the rear of my property keep them at bay.
__________________
"Know thyself."

Oracle at Delphi
jack is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-23-2011, 10:52 AM   #13
Great Horned Owl
 
jack's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Northeastern MA
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by dapjwy View Post
Thanks, jack...good to know.

You really make me want to grow it...and maybe taste it myself. So, I finally did my research, both online and in my Plants of Pennsylvania book. The book says its range is mostly in southern counties...we live in a northern county. The one online source showed spotty populations...none specifically in our area, but within 15 miles. I think I'll probably add it...not much chance I'll get a local source though.

Hmm...as for protecting my chokecherry, I haven't really noticed much problem with rabbits yet...but I'm wondering if you are talking about chokeCHERRY or chokeBERRY. For some reason, I can imagine rabbits eating the bark of chokeBERRY (Aronia sp.) more easily than the chokeCHERRY (Prunus virginiana).
I'd call fifteen miles your area. As to the rabbit damage, it's interesting you mention Aronia, as it too got decimated by those bunnys. But, they ate the chokeberry right down to the soil line, and the stem was about twice the size of a pencil. I had just planted it at the beginning of last summer. Since then I've acquired two more, but this time the protection went up with the planting. The good news is that the one they ate sent up new growth.

Like I stated in a recent post, I'm growing rabbit fencing here...
__________________
"Know thyself."

Oracle at Delphi
jack is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-23-2011, 07:11 PM   #14
WG Hospitality & UAOKA recipient
 
dapjwy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Pennsylvania
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by papercarver View Post
...I am an avid brush pile WATCHER : plenty of wildlife action in a brush pile all year long.

Recently I cut down a real monster of tangle - an ancient honeysuckle that had a 15' foot diameter and was climbing into a red cedar as well, plus a huge multiflora rose entangled within the honeysuckle (sadly, a gigantic fox grape was a casualty as well, but I've got tons of fox grape around so it will almost certainly come back). Within 24 hours of reducing this mess to a brushpile, I had catbirds and wrens using it as a snackbar.

I actually have found it emotionally moving when I rip out these invasive tangles and then a few weeks later I find native plants sprouting on the newly sunny ground. The most intense experience like this was when I spent 2 days clearing out a huge stand of japanese barberry (I think I lost a half pint of blood in the process!) one fall. The next spring a huge swath of maidenhair fern appeared where the barberry had been for years. If there was ever any question in my mind about the value of ripping out all of this invasive brush, that cleared it right up.

It's been three weeks since the big honeysuckle came out and I've got arrowwood seedlings and a few jack-in-the-pulpits coming up on the bare ground...
Your above comments are quite an inspiration. Great to read.

You are lucky to have so many natives rearing to go! I have too few, but still see some tree seedlings and a few other natives coming up. There is an interesting grass-like plant--sedge maybe, not sure that has me kind of intrigued...I'll have to get an ID and hope it is a native that I can pamper and spread.

Meanwhile, I'm adding natives and trying to spread those already on the property. I have several elderberry bushes, with more coming up from seed--as well as a few shoots I was able to successfully transplant last spring.

I can't wait until my blackgum trees get mature enough to start to produce flowers and berries.

It is so great to share our experiences here. ...You've got me wanting to increase the size of my brush pile...and add a couple more. I love how quickly wildlife makes use of them.
__________________
"If suburbia were landscaped with meadows, prairies, thickets or forests, or combinations of these, then the water would sparkle, fish would be good to eat again, birds would sing and human spirits would soar." ~ Lorrie Otto
~ A Native Backyard Blog ~
dapjwy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-23-2011, 07:32 PM   #15
WG Hospitality & UAOKA recipient
 
dapjwy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Pennsylvania
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jack View Post
I'd call fifteen miles your area...
Yes, I'm sure it is! I just think it is odd that there are such huge gaps in its range--there is another isolated patch north of us in NY.

I checked out other species on that same site...several other spotty patches--I wonder how accurate they are...or what causes the isolated patches.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jack View Post
As to the rabbit damage, it's interesting you mention Aronia, as it too got decimated by those bunnys. But, they ate the chokeberry right down to the soil line, and the stem was about twice the size of a pencil. I had just planted it at the beginning of last summer. Since then I've acquired two more, but this time the protection went up with the planting. The good news is that the one they ate sent up new growth.

Like I stated in a recent post, I'm growing rabbit fencing here...
Hmm... the chokecherries I have are already fairly big; I discovered them after clearing out the multiflora rose. Also, I just put in some Aronia in the front, side yard. The rabbits didn't bother it at all---maybe it is too out in the open and too close to the road and driveway.

I did lose one of my newest blackgum seedlings to a rabbit--I'm hoping it comes up from the root--not much stem left. I guess it was still tender as the bigger, older ones were not bothered--just *lightly* browsed by deer. I guess I thought it would be okay...but it was planted where there is a lot of cover...my mistake. I ended up putting a small fence around the other two young ones.

I'm looking forward to taking the fences down when everything is old (and tough) enough to not appeal to the bunnies!
__________________
"If suburbia were landscaped with meadows, prairies, thickets or forests, or combinations of these, then the water would sparkle, fish would be good to eat again, birds would sing and human spirits would soar." ~ Lorrie Otto
~ A Native Backyard Blog ~
dapjwy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-23-2011, 07:48 PM   #16
Great Horned Owl
 
jack's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Northeastern MA
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by dapjwy View Post

I'm looking forward to taking the fences down when everything is old (and tough) enough to not appeal to the bunnies!
I'm with you on that! But some of these shrubs were good sized, indeed, it was only the deep snow that even allowed the rabbits to get started on the thin stems and then work down.

They completely left the Cornus alternifolia alone, along with the red mulberry. They even ate to the ground a wild black cherry seedling, which is reputed to be so poisonous to these critters that they avoid it assiduously.

I planted two beach plums yesterday and fenced them in immediately, not even knowing for sure if they would be a target. I've had it with feeding my new plantings to herbivores - too much wasted money, time, and labor!!!
__________________
"Know thyself."

Oracle at Delphi
jack is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-23-2011, 08:19 PM   #17
WG Hospitality & UAOKA recipient
 
dapjwy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Pennsylvania
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jack View Post
They completely left the Cornus alternifolia alone, along with the red mulberry. They even ate to the ground a wild black cherry seedling, which is reputed to be so poisonous to these critters that they avoid it assiduously.
I have a lot (well several) Cornus alternifolia...and few more seedlings appearing every year. I just transplanted two more into the "woods"...so far they seem not to be a favorite of the rabbits.

I don't think of wild black cherry as being rabbit food either--however, I did see one this spring that had some signs of gnawing. I'd have thought the same about the chokecherry--that was why I was surprised they were hit by your rabbits.

I did lose a Cornus florida that I planted in my planned woodland...I just checked the other day, and no shoots are coming up from the little bark left on the trunk. It is the only one I lost of the 12 or so I've added since moving here.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jack View Post
I planted two beach plums yesterday and fenced them in immediately, not even knowing for sure if they would be a target. I've had it with feeding my new plantings to herbivores - too much wasted money, time, and labor!!!
Over winter, I've been known to cut some branches from the apple or sumac and leave it on the snow for the rabbits to feed on...but, I, too, want to protect the ones I've planted.
__________________
"If suburbia were landscaped with meadows, prairies, thickets or forests, or combinations of these, then the water would sparkle, fish would be good to eat again, birds would sing and human spirits would soar." ~ Lorrie Otto
~ A Native Backyard Blog ~
dapjwy is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
allstars, bill, biodiversity, cullina, updated

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:27 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2