Wildlife Gardeners - North American Wildlife Gardening  

Go Back   Wildlife Gardeners - North American Wildlife Gardening > Wildlife Gardeners of North America Unite > Biodiversity

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 08-28-2010, 09:35 PM   #71
WG Hospitality & UAOKA recipient
 
dapjwy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Pennsylvania
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Equilibrium View Post
dapjwy> very nice spidey.... very nice indeedy!!!! TimSaupe>
Thanks, Equil. I didn't make her, just took her picture.
dapjwy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-20-2010, 12:46 PM   #72
Curious George & UAOKA recipient
 
turttle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Chapel Hill, NC
Default

I just re-found this thread after it was mentioned in Philip's 'introduce me' thread. I started documenting my biodiversity, both animals and plants, with photos and an excel spreadsheet, after reading this thread earlier. I need to do a project for my Certificate in Native Plant Studies, and I'm hoping this will count (or my pollinator garden, which I'm documenting, too). My kids think I'm completely crazy and have OCD about it, but it is interesting and may someday be useful to someone, who knows?
__________________
There is pleasure in the pathless woods, there is rapture in the lonely shore, this is society where none intrudes, by the deep sea, and music in its roar. - Lord Byron

Turttle's pollinator garden
turttle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-27-2011, 09:38 PM   #73
WG Hospitality & UAOKA recipient
 
dapjwy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Pennsylvania
Default

I stumbled upon this older thread and thought I'd bump it up.

I've been trying to document what I have and what wildlife has visited the yard through blogging...however, I find that it is hardly a comprehensive list. Too often I post something here instead of there, or never get around to posting everything I think I will.

Also, I'd like to create an actual list--all in one place--of what have. Recently, I've been spotting a pair of indigo buntings, a bald eagle (flying overhead, but I count that as "visiting our yard", a yet to be identified bird...I'm thinking thrasher, but have yet to get a clear picture, and a (new to me) butterfly or moth.

I'll need to get more disciplined and keep an actual list--and hopefully a photo of each. I may need some help with some of the scientific names.

So, anyone else documenting your biodiversity? Any suggestions for keeping a list? I'd like to do it on my computer, but maybe the old-fashioned way is better. Any suggestions of doing it some where on the WG so it is all in one place and maybe others could do the same?
__________________
"If suburbia were landscaped with meadows, prairies, thickets or forests, or combinations of these, then the water would sparkle, fish would be good to eat again, birds would sing and human spirits would soar." ~ Lorrie Otto
~ A Native Backyard Blog ~
dapjwy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-27-2011, 11:38 PM   #74
WG Prize & Gift Coordinator
 
havalotta's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Michigan
Default

Myself, I make labeled maps of all my plantings per bed.
__________________
The successful woman is the woman that had the chance and took it!

A walk among the elusive Whitetail Deer
havalotta is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-28-2011, 12:09 AM   #75
WG Hospitality & UAOKA recipient
 
dapjwy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Pennsylvania
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by havalotta View Post
Myself, I make labeled maps of all my plantings per bed.
I'd love to identify every tree and label them on a "floor plan/blueprint" of our yard. (What is that called...it is late, and my mind hasn't been cooperating with me for months now?)

I'd like to label the trees, then maybe list the shrubs and wildflowers underneath the canopy and such. ...but I also, probably need a list.

It would be cool to be able to zoom in on what is planted in each section--kind of like Google Maps but on the level of my two acres.
__________________
"If suburbia were landscaped with meadows, prairies, thickets or forests, or combinations of these, then the water would sparkle, fish would be good to eat again, birds would sing and human spirits would soar." ~ Lorrie Otto
~ A Native Backyard Blog ~
dapjwy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-28-2011, 10:22 AM   #76
WG Prize & Gift Coordinator
 
havalotta's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Michigan
Default

Quote:
It would be cool to be able to zoom in on what is planted in each section--kind of like Google Maps but on the level of my two acres.
Oh wouldn't it be!
I was thinking about taking photos of the various areas BEFORE the plants come up in the spring and the bushes have filled with leaves....
Then proceed into paint to label the areas to get THE perfect replica of them.
__________________
The successful woman is the woman that had the chance and took it!

A walk among the elusive Whitetail Deer
havalotta is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-06-2011, 12:13 AM   #77
A Bee's Best Friend
 
Gloria's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Chicago Illinois USA
Default

Tim reached 200 species identified in his own backyard habitat this year. Since he has not updated this thread in awhile I thought you might like to know.

Quote:
So the list stands at 200. It is already past that mark as I type this, truth to tell. And the Habitat is due to undergo a major renovation starting next year. It's time to take it to another level.
In closing, I would urge anyone who takes the time to read this to buy an oak or other native tree the next time you need one in your yard (if you have the space for an oak). Don't follow everyone else and buy a smells-like dead-fish-in-the-spring foreign pear. Leave that garbage for someone else. Buy native viburnums, itea or native hollies instead of boring boxwoods, burning bush or barberries. Dig up some of that water-hogging chemical fertilizer loving lawn and plant a bed of wildflowers. Spend time with your kids gazing at busy bees instead. It may touch your soul as well
__________________
"Half Earth Quest" Edward O. Wilson

http://pollinators-welcome.blogspot.com/
Gloria is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-06-2011, 08:02 AM   #78
Official Plant Nerd
 
Equilibrium's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Default

I remember him!!! He worked for a nursery or something and was doing a bang up job planting natives in his back yard. He did a butterfly bash for charity or something too which was way cool. I remember he posted some photos of the area he was working in. I bet he finished that area and the hard work's paying off if he's up to 200!!! He's on the mark recommending an oak but what a hoot that he said, "Don't follow everyone else and buy a smells-like dead-fish-in-the-spring foreign pear." Native oaks are for sure a better choice than those Calleryana pears that DO smell pretty bad yet.... everyone plants em. Go figure when a native oak can support literally hundreds of species.
--
I saved something about native trees and the biodiversity they're capable of supporting from Tallamy's book.... we're talking they can support the motherload... gotta find it.... be back.
__________________
"Be who you are and say what you feel, because those who mind don't matter and those who matter don't mind."
- Dr. Seuss
Equilibrium is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-06-2011, 08:10 AM   #79
Official Plant Nerd
 
Equilibrium's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Default

This is for the Mid Atlantic region but same holds true for us. The mighty native oak is numero uno!!! You've probably already seen this so this is more a list of options for anyone else who's not interested in planting those nasty non-native "ornamental" stink pears the nursery industry is still pushing....
Attached Thumbnails
How many document their own biodiversity?-20-most-valuable-woody-perennial-genera-terms-supporting-biodiversity-mid-atlan.jpg  
__________________
"Be who you are and say what you feel, because those who mind don't matter and those who matter don't mind."
- Dr. Seuss
Equilibrium is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-06-2011, 10:11 AM   #80
A Bee's Best Friend
 
Gloria's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Chicago Illinois USA
Default

Thanks for putting that list up. Nice selection of natives and it is inspiring to see some numbers associated with what we are doing to increase biodiversity.
__________________
"Half Earth Quest" Edward O. Wilson

http://pollinators-welcome.blogspot.com/
Gloria is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
backyard, biodiversity, birds, diversity, document, documentation, habitat, habitat gardening, habitat gardens, list, plants, poster, species, variety, wildlife

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:48 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2