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Old 08-15-2010, 11:48 AM   #61
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While taking pictures of the two monarch caterpillars utilizing my butterfly weed, I spotted quite a bit of diversity right around the bush--aside from several pollinators I've seen there in the past, that day I spotted three different kinds of spider.

The first I believe to be a young Argiope aurantia...the funny thing is when I went to the other side of the Asclepius to get a different angle, I almost ran into another one. Two of the same species about a foot apart.

The 2nd I was thinking was a yellow crab spider (Misumena vatia), but now I think it is something else. The odd looking one on the end still needs ID...and correct me if I'm wrong on the others. (sorry they are kind of "frass photos")

Thanks. Maybe I can add them to my list---er, I mean start my list with them.
The first spider appears to be an immature banded argiope, Argiope trifasciata - see young Argiope trifasciata -- "A" photo - Bev Wigney photos at pbase.com for an example. The second one could be a white-banded crab spider, Misumenoides formosipes - see Crab Spider - Misumenoides formosipes - BugGuide.Net for an example. Like the goldenrod crab spider, this species can show considerable invidual variation in color pattern. The third spider could be a star-bellied orb weaver, Acanthepeira stellata - see Acanthepeira stellata (Star-bellied Orbweaver) | Flickr - Photo Sharing! for an example.
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Old 08-15-2010, 12:38 PM   #62
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The first spider appears to be an immature banded argiope, Argiope trifasciata - see young Argiope trifasciata -- "A" photo - Bev Wigney photos at pbase.com for an example. The second one could be a white-banded crab spider, Misumenoides formosipes - see Crab Spider - Misumenoides formosipes - BugGuide.Net for an example. Like the goldenrod crab spider, this species can show considerable invidual variation in color pattern. The third spider could be a star-bellied orb weaver, Acanthepeira stellata - see Acanthepeira stellata (Star-bellied Orbweaver) | Flickr - Photo Sharing! for an example.

Thank you, suunto! At least I was close with the Arigiope. That is the spider I was thinking of, I just didn't know the species name.

Could you explain how Arigiope are different than other Arachnids? For some reason I was thinking they are not Arachnids, but I can't remember where I heard that.

I thought the one could be some kind of crab spider--but it looked different than what I was used to seeing.

The star-bellied sneetch--er orbweaver is new to me. I know the picture was not very clear.

Thank you so much for helping to educate me.

BTW, here is a surprisingly clear (for me) close up of the ventral side of the Argiope:
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Old 08-16-2010, 07:24 AM   #63
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Could you explain how Arigiope are different than other Arachnids? For some reason I was thinking they are not Arachnids, but I can't remember where I heard that.

BTW, here is a surprisingly clear (for me) close up of the ventral side of the Argiope:
All spiders (including Argiope species) are arachnids, a class within the phylum Arthropoda. This class also includes all ticks, mites, and scorpions as well as a host of other sometimes bizarre-looking critters. For a brief rundown on their relationship(s), see Arachnid - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

BTW, your last image is a beautiful shot of the dorsal side of your spider...
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Old 08-16-2010, 09:44 AM   #64
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All spiders (including Argiope species) are arachnids, a class within the phylum Arthropoda. This class also includes all ticks, mites, and scorpions as well as a host of other sometimes bizarre-looking critters. For a brief rundown on their relationship(s), see Arachnid - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

BTW, your last image is a beautiful shot of the dorsal side of your spider...
Duh, I've been out of school way too long! And I used to be good with classifications!

That's its dorsal side?!? Me more dumb than me thought!
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Old 08-16-2010, 10:48 AM   #65
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That's its dorsal side?!? Me more dumb than me thought!
Wait a minute! I went back out to check on the monarch "cats" and checked out the Argiope (only one seems to be left. The male and female (circus act) seem to be gone. The other day I saw two younger ones in their place, today nothing.

Anyway, I was checking out the one that is left. She moved to something that she had caught in her web. Seeing her actually MOVE made it very clear to me. Since I was a kid, I always *assumed* that the colorful yellow and black was the spider's back not the underside of her belly (abdomen). When I was a kid, I only looked at them from a distance--they were always blocking my path and I'd go the other way.

Now I realize that I didn't misuse the term--I just didn't realize the colorful side was not the dorsal side! I feel a little less stupid now. I just filed that misinformation in my childhood brain and never questioned it.

Anyway, here are today's pictures. The side views make it clear to me--especially the very unfocused one ~wink~--which is the top and which is the bottom!
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How many document their own biodiversity?-053.jpg   How many document their own biodiversity?-062.jpg   How many document their own biodiversity?-064.jpg  
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Old 08-16-2010, 10:23 PM   #66
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Thank you, suunto! At least I was close with the Arigiope. That is the spider I was thinking of, I just didn't know the species name.

Could you explain how Arigiope are different than other Arachnids? For some reason I was thinking they are not Arachnids, but I can't remember where I heard that.

I thought the one could be some kind of crab spider--but it looked different than what I was used to seeing.

The star-bellied sneetch--er orbweaver is new to me. I know the picture was not very clear.

Thank you so much for helping to educate me.

BTW, here is a surprisingly clear (for me) close up of the ventral side of the Argiope:
What a great spider photo! Nice job!
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Old 08-17-2010, 12:20 AM   #67
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What a great spider photo! Nice job!

Thank you, bridget.

Funny, I still look at it like it is the underside, not the top. Funny how it is hard to give up misinformation stored since childhood! I have to consciously remind myself what I'm seeing.
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Old 08-27-2010, 12:31 PM   #68
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An update on my own documentation - after adding four more to my list last night (Acalymma vittattum, Papilio troilus, Eristalis dimidiata and Pyrgus communis) my list for this year is 85 species of fauna, and 135 total since I've been keeping track last year. I'm going to try to figure out 100 (150 total) by years end . . .
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Old 08-28-2010, 05:09 PM   #69
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dapjwy> very nice spidey.... very nice indeedy!!!! TimSaupe> Whatcha got on your list for fauna so far???
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Old 08-28-2010, 08:43 PM   #70
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For this year? Or all together? Are you going to make me rattle off the whole thing?!? LOL
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