Wildlife Gardeners - North American Wildlife Gardening  

Go Back   Wildlife Gardeners - North American Wildlife Gardening > Wildlife Gardeners of North America Unite > Biodiversity

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 12-07-2009, 06:02 PM   #1
WG Staff
 
Staff's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Default Elevated Carbon Dioxide Levels May Mitigate Losses of Biodiversity from Nitrogen Pollution

Elevated Carbon Dioxide Levels May Mitigate Losses of Biodiversity from Nitrogen Pollution
ScienceDaily
Dec. 3, 2009

Elevated carbon dioxide levels may mitigate losses of biodiversity from nitrogen pollution
excerpt from above:
Quote:
Rising levels of carbon dioxide may overheat the planet and cause other environmental problems, but fears that rising CO2 levels could directly reduce plant biodiversity can be allayed, according to a new study by a University of Minnesota scientist Peter Reich. In fact, rising CO2 may actually help counteract losses of diversity from another environmental villain: the global rain of nitrogen from fertilizers and exhaust fumes.
The study, published in December 4 in the journal Science, involved a 10-year open-air outdoor experiment in which 48 plots...
__________________
The tendency of man's nature to good is like the tendency of water to flow downwards.
-Mencius
Staff is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-08-2009, 01:17 AM   #2
Official Plant Nerd
 
Equilibrium's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Default

May mitigate SOME losses... there's going to be a trade off, Can Nitrogen Be Used to Combat Climate Change?: Scientific American
__________________
"Be who you are and say what you feel, because those who mind don't matter and those who matter don't mind."
- Dr. Seuss
Equilibrium is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
biodiversity, carbon, carbon dioxide, carbon dioxide levels, climate change, co2 levels, combat climate change, dioxide, elevated, elevated carbon dioxide levels, exhaust fumes, fertilizers, levels, loss of biodiversity, losses, losses of biodiversity, mitigate, nitrogen, nitrogen fertilizers, nitrogen pollution, pollution, scientific american

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:40 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2