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Old 08-05-2018, 09:42 PM   #11
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I like our discussions but articles like the one posted are going to get a lot more viewership than our discussions, unfortunately. Plus more people would rather just run with a list than dig deeper. It is why I came up with a list specific to the area where I do my presentations.
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Old 08-07-2018, 01:22 PM   #12
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Nice list! Posting a comment to look into it a bit more at leisure. Thanks
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Old 08-14-2018, 02:16 AM   #13
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Was doing a search for other stuff and topics similar to this one popped up.

A Butterfly Garden for Milkweed

Trees and Shrubs are Host Plants for Many Butterflies

Native Host Plants for a Midwest Butterfly Garden

Thought I'd add them here since we're on the subject.
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Old 08-16-2018, 08:49 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by skip1909 View Post
I was surprised to see plaintain and orchard grass on there too. Both are a pain in my yard. I swear the ticks and mosquitos love to hang out on the little flowering stalks and attack everytime I walk by. I have virginia knotweed in my yard too, not nearly the same as the hellish japanese knotweed.
Plaintain narrow leaved was not on the original list but was at the endangered species site. It is listed as a plant the eggs and caterpillar have been found on and surviving, in some places. It does not suggest planting. I too was surprised by the orchard grass and would not plant in a garden setting.
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Old 08-16-2018, 08:51 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KC Clark View Post
Was doing a search for other stuff and topics similar to this one popped up.

A Butterfly Garden for Milkweed

Trees and Shrubs are Host Plants for Many Butterflies

Native Host Plants for a Midwest Butterfly Garden

Thought I'd add them here since we're on the subject.
Great information on previous post KC Clark. It pays to do a bit of exploring.

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While attending the Tallamy presentation we got a handout of the best plants for Lepidoptera (butterflies and moths). Here's the list of woody plants for the Mid-Atlantic region:

Quercus - Oaks .. 534 species of Lepidoptera supported
Prunus - Black Cherry .. 456
Salix - Willow .. 455
Betula - Birch .. 413
Populus - Poplar .. 368
Malus - Crabapple .. 311
Vaccinium - Blueberry .. 288
Acer - Maple .. 285
Ulmus - Elm .. 213
Pinus - Pine .. 203
Carya - Hickory .. 200
Crataegus - Hawthorn .. 159
Picea - Spruce .. 156
Alnus - Alder .. 156
Tilia - Basswood .. 150
Fraxinus - Ash .. 150
Rosa - Rose .. 139
Corylus - Filbert .. 131
Juglans - Walnut .. 130
Fagus - Beech .. 126
Castanea - Chestnut .. 125
By comparison, the best perennial - Solidago (Goldenrod) .. 115.
NEWisc
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Old 08-16-2018, 03:27 PM   #16
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Quote:
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Great information on previous post KC Clark. It pays to do a bit of exploring.
And it is why I MUCH PREFER a forum to Facebook. Search function on Facebook is close to worthless so most of the posted info is quickly lost unless you save it. Here, past knowledge is easily accessible.

You included the part about goldenrod being the #1 perennial. When I was out with my blacklight flashlight night. I found multiple caterpillars on goldenrod. Would never have found them in the light day because they are as green as the leaves they are feeding on.
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Old 08-16-2018, 09:13 PM   #17
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How come you use a blacklight flashlight?
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Old 08-17-2018, 12:31 AM   #18
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How come you use a blacklight flashlight?
A lot of insects fluoresce when you hit them with a blacklight. In the caterpillar world, seems like all Sphinx moth pillars. Lunas and polyphemus do. Monarchs do. Anyway, you go out with your blacklight flashlight, shine on your trees and plants, and see what stands out. Unfortunately, bird crap really stands out so you get to see a lot of that.

Monday night, my "good" finds were 5 lunas, hummingbird clearwing, and a walnut sphinx. Last night, all I brought in was two monarchs. I see a lot of caterpillars but I limit what I bring in. Cannot raise everything.

Not my video. Shows a guy finding Sphinx moth pillars on his tomatoes.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JIJUsGcA4R4
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Old 08-17-2018, 06:01 AM   #19
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Originally Posted by Gloria View Post
Plaintain narrow leaved was not on the original list but was at the endangered species site. It is listed as a plant the eggs and caterpillar have been found on and surviving, in some places. It does not suggest planting. I too was surprised by the orchard grass and would not plant in a garden setting.
I see these commonly in the margins of my yard. I wouldnt plant them but its interesting to know they can provide food for something other than pests.

Staphylea trifolia is another early season nectar shrub that I didnt see on the list. Maybe it is not host to a large number of moths and butterflies but it is one of the first to flower.
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Old 08-17-2018, 08:45 AM   #20
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Great thread. Great comments.

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