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Old 07-12-2017, 07:25 PM   #1
A Bee's Best Friend
 
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Default Recovery:Bringing Back Bumble Bees.

https://blog.nature.org/science/2017...ngered-native/

By Ted Williams
July 11, 2017

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For example, applying criteria of the International Union for Conservation of Nature, the Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation reports that of the 46 indigenous bumble bee species in the U.S. and Canada 28 percent are at some risk of extinction.
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The wildlife management establishment has traditionally ignored native bees. But that’s starting to change thanks to bee advocates led by the Xerces Society, Clay Bolt, Dr. Sydney Cameron of the University of Illinois and Dr. Robbin Thorp of the University of California at Davis.
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Old 07-12-2017, 10:14 PM   #2
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Public awareness is increasing.
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Old 07-16-2017, 09:16 AM   #3
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I remember that about five years ago we had a "search" active on the site with folks diligently looking for traces of the Rusty Patch in their yards or in their travels. I don't believe any involved ever found one.

In this interesting video that Gloria posted, it mentions the three needs of bumble bees, with one of them being nesting habitat. What do other here do to insure a welcoming habitat and nesting options for their bumble bees???

I have numerous brush piles and a nice leaf compost pile, but I wonder if I could be doing more...

Any suggestions???
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Old 07-16-2017, 10:23 AM   #4
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Leave some unmown areas in your yard, don't fill in old rodent holes, have lots of flowering plants! I've seen an equal number of bumblebees and honeybees this year. I'd say it's a normal moderate number, not scarce or particularly abundant. I'm glad I have garden plants blooming now because the field is between blooms, save the Queen Anne's Lace. Mountain mint will be blooming shortly though. There are still some late Butterflyweed left to bloom. Early goldenrod is just starting. Then come the ironweed and the rest of the goldenrods and mistflower.
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Old 07-17-2017, 01:01 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jack View Post
I remember that about five years ago we had a "search" active on the site with folks diligently looking for traces of the Rusty Patch in their yards or in their travels. I don't believe any involved ever found one.

In this interesting video that Gloria posted, it mentions the three needs of bumble bees, with one of them being nesting habitat. What do other here do to insure a welcoming habitat and nesting options for their bumble bees???

I have numerous brush piles and a nice leaf compost pile, but I wonder if I could be doing more...

Any suggestions???
Most bumble bees do nest on or under the ground, but some species will nest at higher elevations. I have read several accounts of bumble bees nesting in cavities in old wood fence posts, unoccupied bird nest boxes and openings in the side of old wood buildings.

Something similar to a bird house mounted on a wood fence might work. The entrance hole could be sized to accommodate bumble bees instead of birds.
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Old 07-17-2017, 08:25 PM   #6
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I love reading all of your posts.

Great group of passionate people. You've all made me smile.
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Old 07-18-2017, 08:45 AM   #7
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Originally Posted by NEWisc View Post
Most bumble bees do nest on or under the ground, but some species will nest at higher elevations. I have read several accounts of bumble bees nesting in cavities in old wood fence posts, unoccupied bird nest boxes and openings in the side of old wood buildings.

Something similar to a bird house mounted on a wood fence might work. The entrance hole could be sized to accommodate bumble bees instead of birds.
I hate to acknowledge this, but years before I joined this site, I found that one of my bird houses was filled with bees. I ejected them manually with gloves on and tried to set up the house again for birds.

Wish I knew then what I know now...
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Old 07-18-2017, 01:07 PM   #8
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I have a few places with stacked or piled rocks, one around the Hobbit house door, one at each end of the dry creek and an area where water runs from the house gutter. The last one just large flat rocks tilted away from the house in step like pattern to guide water without creating a rut. I have seen bees entering/leaving these areas over the years. Maybe I will start a thread of rock stacks where bumbles might nest. Or should we just use this one?
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Old 07-18-2017, 07:03 PM   #9
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It should fit just fine right where we're at as the thread itself is called....Bringing Back the Bumble Bees.
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Old 07-19-2017, 12:58 PM   #10
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Wish I knew then what I know now...
Don't we all!
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