Wildlife Gardeners - North American Wildlife Gardening  

Go Back   Wildlife Gardeners - North American Wildlife Gardening > Wildlife Gardeners of North America Unite > Biodiversity

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 01-31-2016, 02:26 PM   #1
A Bee's Best Friend
 
Gloria's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Chicago Illinois USA
Default Dramatic Wood Thrush Decline

Another incentive to keep a habitat garden in place of that lawn.


Smithsonian Scientists Solve Puzzle of Dramatic Wood Thrush Decline

Quote:
For the past 50 years, the number of wood thrush (Hylocichla mustelina) that breed in the United States has decreased more than 60 percent. However, because wood thrush migrate thousands of miles each year between their breeding grounds in eastern North America and wintering grounds in tropical forests from southern Mexico to Colombia, scientists have had trouble pinpointing which part of the iconic species’ annual migratory cycle is causing that decline. Scientists from the Smithsonian Migratory Bird Center (SMBC) at the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute (SCBI) have found that the steepest regional declines have likely been the result of loss of habitat on breeding grounds in North America.
__________________
"Half Earth Quest" Edward O. Wilson

http://pollinators-welcome.blogspot.com/
Gloria is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-31-2016, 03:35 PM   #2
A Bee's Best Friend
 
Gloria's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Chicago Illinois USA
Default

Why I'll never have a lawn again | MNN - Mother Nature Network

Quote:
Once I had spent a couple of very busy weeks acclimating to Oregon life, I realized that the meadow that surrounded my new home in the mountains wasn't an unkempt lawn, but one of the local types of ecosystems that flourish here naturally; they form post-fire. And in my first weeks enjoying my new favorite place in the world — the back porch — I was stunned and delighted by the plethora of life the meadow supported. And I immediately thought of that life extinguished if I had started mowing.
Quote:
Sarah Baker, who is battling her town for the right to keep a meadow rather than a lawn, puts this death-by-lawn into numbers when she writes in the Washington Post: "There are 40.5 million acres of lawn in the United States, more than double the size of the country’s largest national forest. We disconnect ourselves from wildlife habitat loss by viewing it as a problem caused by industry and agriculture. But habitat loss isn’t a problem happening out there somewhere; it’s happening in our own back yards."
Quote:
As Baker writes in her anti-mow article, "Nature preserves and parks are not enough to fix the problem; much of wildlife is migratory and needs continuous habitat to thrive. Natural yards can act as bridges between the larger natural spaces."
As human beings take over more and more of the natural landscape, animals, birds and insects need as many bridges as possible — and a lawn isn't one. They are noise-pollution-producing timesucks (as another writer called them), that do nothing for threatened native life, and to top it off, they're boring. I'm done with them forever.
And the sound of wind through tall meadow grasses? Incomparable.
__________________
"Half Earth Quest" Edward O. Wilson

http://pollinators-welcome.blogspot.com/
Gloria is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-01-2016, 06:58 PM   #3
WG Hospitality & UAOKA recipient
 
dapjwy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Pennsylvania
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gloria View Post
Another incentive to keep a habitat garden in place of that lawn.


Smithsonian Scientists Solve Puzzle of Dramatic Wood Thrush Decline
I didn't know that they were in such a decline. Yes, it does make what we are doing seem that much more important.
__________________
"If suburbia were landscaped with meadows, prairies, thickets or forests, or combinations of these, then the water would sparkle, fish would be good to eat again, birds would sing and human spirits would soar." ~ Lorrie Otto
~ A Native Backyard Blog ~
dapjwy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-01-2016, 07:09 PM   #4
WG Hospitality & UAOKA recipient
 
dapjwy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Pennsylvania
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gloria View Post
Why I'll never have a lawn again | MNN - Mother Nature Network
Quote:
Once I had spent a couple of very busy weeks acclimating to Oregon life, I realized that the meadow that surrounded my new home in the mountains wasn't an unkempt lawn, but one of the local types of ecosystems that flourish here naturally; they form post-fire. And in my first weeks enjoying my new favorite place in the world — the back porch — I was stunned and delighted by the plethora of life the meadow supported. And I immediately thought of that life extinguished if I had started mowing.
How fortunate--I wish that it was as easy here to just stop mowing and have a native habitat grow up.

Not only did she recognize the value of the habitat...she is spreading the word.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gloria View Post
Why I'll never have a lawn again | MNN - Mother Nature Network




Quote:
As Baker writes in her anti-mow article, "Nature preserves and parks are not enough to fix the problem; much of wildlife is migratory and needs continuous habitat to thrive. Natural yards can act as bridges between the larger natural spaces."
As human beings take over more and more of the natural landscape, animals, birds and insects need as many bridges as possible — and a lawn isn't one. They are noise-pollution-producing timesucks (as another writer called them), that do nothing for threatened native life, and to top it off, they're boring. I'm done with them forever.
And the sound of wind through tall meadow grasses? Incomparable.
She is preaching to the choir here. The idea of wildlife bridges/corridors is huge...and getting that idea into the general public's awareness is critical.

This sounds like an article for the "Dead Lawn Society" forum.
__________________
"If suburbia were landscaped with meadows, prairies, thickets or forests, or combinations of these, then the water would sparkle, fish would be good to eat again, birds would sing and human spirits would soar." ~ Lorrie Otto
~ A Native Backyard Blog ~
dapjwy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-04-2016, 05:36 PM   #5
A Bee's Best Friend
 
Gloria's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Chicago Illinois USA
Default

The wood thrush is not listed as endangered but has had a serious decline in numbers. Like many songbirds that migrate the problems are numerous and widely distributed. The above article from the Smithsonian was about pinpointing where the most problems are arising and what can be done and where it will be most effective.
Changing land use makes for smaller woods, if any, where predators and cowbirds have better access and less leaf litter for the invertebrates wood thrush count on to feed young.

https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/...sh/lifehistory

Quote:
Wood Thrushes breed throughout mature deciduous and mixed forests in eastern North America, most commonly those with American beech, sweet gum, red maple, black gum, eastern hemlock, flowering dogwood, American hornbeam, oaks, or pines. They nest somewhat less successfully in fragmented forests and even suburban parks where there are enough large trees for a territory. Ideal habitat includes trees over 50 feet tall, a moderate understory of saplings and shrubs, an open floor with moist soil and decaying leaf litter, and water nearby. Favored understory species include southern arrowwood, smooth blackhaw, spicebush, coast pepperbush, rhododendron, and blueberry. In their winter range, they are most abundant in the interior of mature, shady, broad-leaved and palm tropical forests in lowlands. As in their temperate range, they will also inhabit forest edges and the denser understory of second-growth forests.

I love listening to the wood thrush sing.
https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Wood_Thrush/sounds



Quote:
Though still numerous, its rapidly declining numbers may be due in part to cowbird nest parasitism at the edges of fragmenting habitat and to acid rain's depletion of its invertebrate
__________________
"Half Earth Quest" Edward O. Wilson

http://pollinators-welcome.blogspot.com/
Gloria is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-04-2016, 06:50 PM   #6
WG Hospitality & UAOKA recipient
 
dapjwy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Pennsylvania
Default

I guess that I've known fragmented/smaller woodlands benefit cowbirds....I guess my pocket woodland, which may still benefit many species is less than ideal when it comes to cowbirds.
__________________
"If suburbia were landscaped with meadows, prairies, thickets or forests, or combinations of these, then the water would sparkle, fish would be good to eat again, birds would sing and human spirits would soar." ~ Lorrie Otto
~ A Native Backyard Blog ~
dapjwy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-05-2016, 01:25 AM   #7
A Bee's Best Friend
 
Gloria's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Chicago Illinois USA
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by dapjwy View Post
I guess that I've known fragmented/smaller woodlands benefit cowbirds....I guess my pocket woodland, which may still benefit many species is less than ideal when it comes to cowbirds.
Cowbirds are just doing what is best for cowbirds. They are not good or bad and they do belong in the over all scheme. Many species are parasitic in nature. Right now wood thrush are having a bad time but many species of birds have developed a way to thrive despite the cowbird.

As gardeners we can not do much about breedng and over wintering places for the wood thrush but we can help provide rest and forage during migration times. Plus there are many species of birds that do breed within our human communities when we create our spaces with other species in mind. We each do what we can in the spaces over which we wield some influence.

I like reading about all that you have done and plan to do. There can be satisfaction in following the evolution of a wildlife garden, our own and others. We not only learn from each other but also garner motivation to continue.

Interesting maps showing wood thrush migration,

http://dghaskell.com/2012/07/26/trac...wood-thrushes/

Quote:
The image above shows the path of one wood thrush over two years as it moves between its wintering area in Belize and its breeding grounds in Pennsylvania. The particularities of the route taken bring the map alive. The details change each year. In the fall of 2009, the bird came south over Florida and Cuba, but took the direct route across the Gulf of Mexico the next year. The map makes clear that migration is not an abstraction, but a yearly marvel.
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases...0723141820.htm

Quote:
Summary:
Researchers have created the first migratory connectivity map produced for a songbird, using tracking from both breeding and winter sites. They were able to trace the route taken by wood thrushes from North America using bird 'backpacks'. They discovered that wood thrushes from Canada don't migrate to the same areas as their southern neighbors, and actually have a longer migratory route. The map will help identify specific areas for habitat protection.
__________________
"Half Earth Quest" Edward O. Wilson

http://pollinators-welcome.blogspot.com/
Gloria is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-05-2016, 07:49 PM   #8
WG Hospitality & UAOKA recipient
 
dapjwy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Pennsylvania
Default

I am not one of the cowbirds haters.

I know that they are native birds that are only doing what they evolved to do. There are many things in nature that I find "disturbing", but it is part of the natural world...and I am trying to welcome the natural world to our yard...I guess I have to take the "good" with the "bad".

I am just concerned that fragmenting the forest is causing problems for birds that normally don't encounter the cowbirds.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gloria View Post
As gardeners we can not do much about breedng and over wintering places for the wood thrush but we can help provide rest and forage during migration times. Plus there are many species of birds that do breed within our human communities when we create our spaces with other species in mind. We each do what we can in the spaces over which we wield some influence.
I like the idea that we are providing places for rest and foraging for migrating birds as well as those that live here year round. Reading your comments makes me feel better about all that we are trying to do.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gloria View Post
I like reading about all that you have done and plan to do. There can be satisfaction in following the evolution of a wildlife garden, our own and others. We not only learn from each other but also garner motivation to continue.
Yes. Thank you. That means a lot to me that you find satisfaction, not only in your own garden habitat, but also enjoy reading about what I am doing and planning for the future. That is one of the benefits of this forum. I love it too.

Thank you for your encouragement.
__________________
"If suburbia were landscaped with meadows, prairies, thickets or forests, or combinations of these, then the water would sparkle, fish would be good to eat again, birds would sing and human spirits would soar." ~ Lorrie Otto
~ A Native Backyard Blog ~
dapjwy is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
decline, dramatic, thrush, wood

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:11 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2