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Old 01-14-2016, 02:56 PM   #1
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Default But what do bugs do for us?

All bugs have a place in the food web. Many are work horses of the ecosystem services we are beginning to appreciate. But insects have an allure all their own. From dragonflies to beetles to spiders , the world of insect knowledge is expanding and bringing in a whole new group of eco-friends wanting to see and know even more. May they one day rival birder groups in both number and enthusiasm.

Why we should learn to love all insects ? not just the ones that work for us

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Insects, which include more than a million described species, represent roughly two-thirds of the biodiversity on Earth. But they have a big PR problem – many think of insects as little more than crop-eating, disease-carrying jumper-munchers. But in reality, species fitting this bill are but a tiny part of an enormous picture.
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Rather than focusing primarily on their functional value, we could instead place a greater emphasis on sharing the fascinating behavior and wonderful appearances commonplace in the insect world. Once people become better acquainted with these qualities, they fall in love. And when people love something, they will fight for its protection regardless of whether or not it contributes to the provision of a particular ecosystem service.
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we start to recognize the beauty, mystery and wonder of the insect world for what it is: beautiful, mysterious and wonderful. Through building a stronger appreciation of the important inherent value of insect biodiversity, hopefully “what do they do for us?” will share more space with “what can we do for them?”.
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Old 01-14-2016, 05:50 PM   #2
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I find this so interesting Gloria. I immediately thought of the theory of biophilia and the fact that you reference Edward O. Wilson just brings it all together.

I will leave it to you to explain biophilia as you are better equipped to do so although I did touch upon it in graduate school as some of my colleagues based their theses on the concept.

Just as a side note my senior project as an undergrad was illustrating Lepidoptera. I thoroughly enjoyed spending time in the entomology building alone just pulling specimens and drawing with many different techniques and media including crow quill pen. Old school!
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Old 01-14-2016, 08:46 PM   #3
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I read this earlier today via a Facebook link from someone. Really interesting. I can get lost for hours in just my little yard watching "bugs". Such diversity. So busy, busy, busy. I don't know for sure what they all DO...or why. But I do know for sure that our world is a richer place because they are here. "Bugs" are awesome
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Old 01-15-2016, 10:18 AM   #4
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Before I joined nature groups I never noticed all the interesting bugs in my gardens. I love to watch them especially the really tiny bees and flies.
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Old 01-16-2016, 03:14 PM   #5
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Not me...lol.. but there are resources to help understand biophilia .
I find Biophilia is both easy to define and hard to understand,especially within the complexity of the affects of biophilia on human behavior.

The term biophilia was used by German-born American psychoanalyst Erich Fromm in "The Anatomy of Human Destructiveness" (1973), which described biophilia as “the passionate love of life and of all that is alive.”

Then in 1984 E. O. Wilson's book "Biophilia" gave us the idea that the tendency of humans to focus on and to affiliate with nature and other life-forms has, in part, a genetic basis.

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/AS...e-gardeners-20

biophilia hypothesis | Britannica.com
Biophilia hypothesis,the idea that humans possess an innate tendency to seek connections with nature and other forms of life.

An interview with Wilson where he talks about this affinity of man to life and how that may need to be nurtured in our current culture.

NOVA - Official Website | A Conversation With E.O. Wilson

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Because the living environment is what really sustains us. The living environment creates the soil, creates most of the atmosphere. It's not just something "out there." The biosphere is a membrane, a very thin membrane of living organism. We were born in it, and it presents exactly the right conditions for our lives, including—the whole point of our conversation—psychological and spiritual [benefits].
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To what degree do you think that emotional problems that many people today, particularly in cities, suffer from, like depression and anxiety, might be due to a lack of contact with nature?
I think it may have a lot to do with it. Psychologists and psychiatrists themselves seem in agreement on the benefits of what's called "the wilderness experience." To be able to [give this to] young people who may have gotten themselves all tangled up with their concerns about ego and peer relationships and their future and are falling into that frame of mind and becoming very depressed because they have such a narrow conception of the world. The wilderness experience is being able to get into a world that's just filled with life, that's fascinating to watch in every aspect, and that does not depend on you. It tells them that there's so much more to the world.
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Old 01-16-2016, 03:41 PM   #6
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Originally Posted by EllenW View Post
Before I joined nature groups I never noticed all the interesting bugs in my gardens. I love to watch them especially the really tiny bees and flies.
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Posted by katjh...I can get lost for hours in just my little yard watching "bugs". Such diversity. So busy, busy, busy. I don't know for sure what they all DO...or why. But I do know for sure that our world is a richer place because they are here. "Bugs" are awesome
Ellen and kat, it is that interaction with nature, not just looking out the window of a car driving by or seeing pictures or video on a screen, which may bring to the fore what is called biophilia.
Some benefit may occur when design elements are used in human habitat that incorporates living organisms. Soil, plants, animals, even sunshine and bodies of water throughout our landscapes changes human behavior, even lowering crime stats. I think the more we touch and see and get to know other living organisms the more humanity benefits. Not the least of which an involvement with this life teaches us to place value on the earth and all life.
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Old 01-16-2016, 04:28 PM   #7
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Updated Singing Insects Guide - Wild Things Community

https://natureinquiries.wordpress.com/
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Old 01-16-2016, 07:21 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by Gloria View Post
Not me...lol.. but there are resources to help understand biophilia .
I find Biophilia is both easy to define and hard to understand,especially within the complexity of the affects of biophilia on human behavior.

The term biophilia was used by German-born American psychoanalyst Erich Fromm in "The Anatomy of Human Destructiveness" (1973), which described biophilia as “the passionate love of life and of all that is alive.”

Then in 1984 E. O. Wilson's book "Biophilia" gave us the idea that the tendency of humans to focus on and to affiliate with nature and other life-forms has, in part, a genetic basis.

Robot Check

biophilia hypothesis | Britannica.com
Biophilia hypothesis,the idea that humans possess an innate tendency to seek connections with nature and other forms of life.

An interview with Wilson where he talks about this affinity of man to life and how that may need to be nurtured in our current culture.

NOVA - Official Website | A Conversation With E.O. Wilson
This is new to me. I love the quotes that you pulled out! Thank you for sharing.
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Old 01-16-2016, 10:46 PM   #9
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I think appreciating nature teaches people about respect. When you see how everything works so well together, the plants, insects, wildlife, etc. you can't help but admire it. If you learn to respect and appreciate nature I think you learn to respect all life including people
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Old 01-17-2016, 10:14 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gloria View Post
Ellen and kat, it is that interaction with nature, not just looking out the window of a car driving by or seeing pictures or video on a screen, which may bring to the fore what is called biophilia.
Some benefit may occur when design elements are used in human habitat that incorporates living organisms. Soil, plants, animals, even sunshine and bodies of water throughout our landscapes changes human behavior, even lowering crime stats. I think the more we touch and see and get to know other living organisms the more humanity benefits. Not the least of which an involvement with this life teaches us to place value on the earth and all life.
Thanks for sharing all of this, Gloria!

When I'm outside - in my own yard, in the woods, or hiking in the mountains - I have a strong desire to TOUCH the rocks or the bark of the trees. I always crouch down to examine plants, bugs, etc. I wouldn't call it something that I choose to do, rather something that I need to do. I feel that it is genetic. I have a couple of kids who NEED to be outside and a couple of kids who enjoy it but don't seem to need it as much. I say kids, but they are all adults now They were all home schooled and we spent a lot of time outside when they were younger. To me, that says that it is nature not nurture that made two of them more "outdoorsy" (like me) and two of them not so much (like Hubby).
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