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Old 12-16-2015, 08:46 PM   #1
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Default Impact of nonnative trees on food available for breeding birds

More evidence that planting native trees matters.

https://www.nwf.org/News-and-Magazin...ive-Trees.aspx

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One of the biggest—yet least recognized—impacts humans are having on urban habitats is a change in vegetation from predominantly native to nonnative species. “Here in North America, about 80 percent of suburbia is landscaped with plants from Asia,” says Doug Tallamy, an entomologist at the University of Delaware and Narango’s co-advisor. He argues that when nonnative plants replace natives, entire food webs are disrupted by the loss of specialized plant-eating insects—the most important food for animals ranging from other insects and spiders to reptiles and amphibians to mammals and birds.

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Even without these data, watching Aluminum/Green, Hot Pink and her mate forage in my yard already has me convinced. Beyond chickadees and other resident birds, Narango’s team recorded a dizzying array of insect-dependent migrants—from scarlet tanagers to warbling vireos to black-and-white warblers—passing through my neighborhood on their way to breeding grounds. To provide the insect prey these birds need, my gardening chores this spring may include a new task: removing a few crape myrtle trees and replacing them with natives.
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Old 12-16-2015, 09:52 PM   #2
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This makes me even more determined that my restoration project and our philosophy here on Wildlife Gardeners is exactly what everyone should be doing.

Although I've resisted using Facebook, I have begun using it more often. On occasion I have posted a thing or two about natives...so far, one woman at work asked me about natives and my post (in real life, not on FB). I shared a little about it and said that I'd look for other things to post. (I want to find some "beginner-friendly" articles or diagrams to post.)

I'm going to look into this article and maybe pull out some quotes like you did.

I think reading that about 80% of what most people plant are from Asia is a powerful statement.
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Old 12-18-2015, 07:02 AM   #3
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Tallamy's "what to plant" list seems a good place to start.

http://www.bringingnaturehome.net/what-to-plant.html
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Old 12-21-2015, 08:33 PM   #4
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Tallamy's "what to plant" list seems a good place to start.

http://www.bringingnaturehome.net/what-to-plant.html
Yes.

I think I will begin with a few simple facts to bring people up to speed--those who have no idea that what they see growing "wild" is often not native.

Just today, at work I was talking to a friend who has seen some photos from my blog and has a rough idea about what I am doing. She has always show interest. I mentioned that I'd read that about 80%,of what is planted in the suburbs is from Asia...the. I explained how it doesn't support North American wildlife. Breifly mentioned caterpillars needing specific foods and birds needin caterpillars to feed their young.

A substitute teacher was in the room and showed interest ad well. I think the general public is ready to hear the message...and social media might be the way to go.
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Old 12-22-2015, 12:35 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by dapjwy View Post
I think the general public is ready to hear the message...and social media might be the way to go.
Know your audience. FB allows you to exclude people. If you have an anti-bug friend, don't let them know that oak in their front yard is a bug magnet because that oak may be taken down.

I have FB friends who do not like anything with more than 4 legs. A few have Raid ready to go at all times. One would rip out anything that caused bugs to come near her. Another hates bugs because her plants are precious. Thing is all her plants are non-native so Japanese beetles are about all she gets.

Anyway, when you post to your FB page, you have a couple options that I know about. One option is when you post something, click on "Custom" and add people to the "Don't share with" list. Other option is to create a list that just includes your nature lover friends and then have the post seen just by them. I have a list of my Lepidoptera friends. Cannot say I've ever used that list to post something. It is mostly for me to remember who some of these people are. They friend me because of my posts in Lep groups and three months later I'll have zero memory about why they are my "Friend."
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Old 12-22-2015, 09:14 PM   #6
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I'm rather careful on Facebook because I have neighbors that are "friends" there. One of these neighbors is "Mr. Mows-Alot" and his wife. They are very particular about their lawn. I try not to say too much about the "bugs" I'm hosting here . They do enjoy sitting on their deck and watching all of the bird activity in my back yard.

I keep an extra copy of "Bringing Nature Home" handy so that I can lend it out to any one expressing an interest in planting more natives. I've "lost" a couple of books over the years, but I'm hoping that means they are being used and shared!
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Old 12-23-2015, 12:31 PM   #7
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Those are great facebook tips KC Clark. I made the mistake of having a post about chemicals public one time. I said that I never use chemicals on my property. The next thing I know one neighbor is spraying my plants with chemicals. So I am extremely careful on facebook too and nothing I post is public. I belong to a closed native plant wildlife group on facebook. I really enjoy that.
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Old 12-23-2015, 12:33 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by katjh View Post
I'm rather careful on Facebook because I have neighbors that are "friends" there. One of these neighbors is "Mr. Mows-Alot" and his wife. They are very particular about their lawn. I try not to say too much about the "bugs" I'm hosting here . They do enjoy sitting on their deck and watching all of the bird activity in my back yard.

I keep an extra copy of "Bringing Nature Home" handy so that I can lend it out to any one expressing an interest in planting more natives. I've "lost" a couple of books over the years, but I'm hoping that means they are being used and shared!
That is a great idea about keeping a copy of Bringing Nature Home to lend. I think I will do that too.
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Old 12-24-2015, 09:49 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by KC Clark View Post
Know your audience. FB allows you to exclude people. If you have an anti-bug friend, don't let them know that oak in their front yard is a bug magnet because that oak may be taken down.

I have FB friends who do not like anything with more than 4 legs. A few have Raid ready to go at all times. One would rip out anything that caused bugs to come near her. Another hates bugs because her plants are precious. Thing is all her plants are non-native so Japanese beetles are about all she gets.

Anyway, when you post to your FB page, you have a couple options that I know about. One option is when you post something, click on "Custom" and add people to the "Don't share with" list. Other option is to create a list that just includes your nature lover friends and then have the post seen just by them. I have a list of my Lepidoptera friends. Cannot say I've ever used that list to post something. It is mostly for me to remember who some of these people are. They friend me because of my posts in Lep groups and three months later I'll have zero memory about why they are my "Friend."
Very good point.

The fact is, no one ever notices the bugs eating oak leaves....I never notice holes "detracting" from the trees/leaves. That said, perhaps some extre.e people would have them removed...something I have no intention of encouraging.

I know two woman at work who say they hate bugs (and other critters)...they don't wish them dead; they just want them out in nature and not near them.

I think starting with simple things like "there can be no butterflies without caterpillars"...and then, I'd like to add the quote from your signature line "caterpillars do all of the work, butterfliesget all the glory"...and go from there. My goal is to start people thinking...and, then, hope that their minds will be open to the rest. I like to think most people like butterflies, but I recall a neighbor who was afraid of them!

Thanks for helping me think this through. At the same time, I'm hoping most people who don't like bugs will not even bother to read links I share.
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Old 12-24-2015, 09:54 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by katjh View Post
I'm rather careful on Facebook because I have neighbors that are "friends" there. One of these neighbors is "Mr. Mows-Alot" and his wife. They are very particular about their lawn. I try not to say too much about the "bugs" I'm hosting here . They do enjoy sitting on their deck and watching all of the bird activity in my back yard.

I keep an extra copy of "Bringing Nature Home" handy so that I can lend it out to any one expressing an interest in planting more natives. I've "lost" a couple of books over the years, but I'm hoping that means they are being used and shared!
Yes, you are probably much better off having them focus on the birds and pretty flowers....I will likely use the word "habitat" and focus more on that than the actual food web.

Love the idea of having an extra copy to share. I lent out one of Sara Stein's books and never got it back either...and assumed the same.
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