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Old 11-25-2015, 12:58 PM   #1
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Default Why Prairie Matters - Ted talk

Interesting perspective. We all know that a prairie can not be replicated in its complexity by human hand. The effort makes for places of beauty and useful function but thousands of years of creation will not be rushed. There is a bit of what can still be called prairie left to us to protect. These jewels are important to conserve. Carol Davit talks about that work here in a Ted Talk video.

https://youtu.be/Gl5wzHjzvMk
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Old 11-28-2015, 08:51 PM   #2
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Thanks for sharing this, Gloria!
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Old 12-06-2015, 09:25 AM   #3
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Nice video.
Her photos enhanced her presentation and got people thinking about what a prairie is truly about. Most certainly worthy of saving!
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Old 12-11-2015, 06:30 PM   #4
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Another excellent find!

I'm so glad to have time to explore this site (Wildlife Gardeners) more than just giving it a quick peek.

It is definitely vitally important to preserve the intact remnants...but it is said that even a restoration planted in the 1940s still doesn't support all of the species that naturally occur in the original.

Of course, I still plan to plant my Eastern meadow...and I'm certain that it will attract and support a lot more species than I currently have, but I always imagined that as the years wen on, the more conservative species would find a place in the mix as the conditions become more and more to their liking. I'm still assuming this will be true for some...but not all species.
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Old 12-11-2015, 09:42 PM   #5
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Of course, I still plan to plant my Eastern meadow
Your meadow will get more diverse every year, but 40 years is nothing compared to 1000's of years. Just remember, that was then and this is now. We may never replicate but we do recreate within current circumstances returning function to habitat. Even nature goes through a series of stages often starting over in large or small disturbed places (by human or natural events) with pioneer species.
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Old 12-12-2015, 08:57 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gloria View Post
Your meadow will get more diverse every year, but 40 years is nothing compared to 1000's of years. Just remember, that was then and this is now. We may never replicate but we do recreate within current circumstances returning function to habitat. Even nature goes through a series of stages often starting over in large or small disturbed places (by human or natural events) with pioneer species.
Thanks, Gloria. I know whatever I achieve here with my meadow, woodland, rocky barren, pond, and wetland will be a huge improvement. It will also be great to see the biodiversity increase over the years.

I like your phrasing of "returning function to habitat".

Yes, 40 years compared to 1,000 does make sense...I just would've liked to know that after 20, 40, or 60 years that more species were supported than in the orginal planting.

As for the natural succession, I'm helping it along...but, I will also be keeping some sections in early stages as well, I think.
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Old 12-27-2015, 01:12 AM   #7
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An hour long talk hosted by the Prairie Research Institute. Very interesting.

John White begins at 08:10
The Illinois Prairie and its People: Past, Present, and Future
John White, Ecological Services, Urbana, Illinois.
Presented October 22, 2013



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fjLEWAVplnI
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Old 12-27-2015, 11:19 AM   #8
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Thanks for the link, Gloria. I opened it, but will have to view it later.

Now that I am finally making progress on smothering the existing vegetation for my native meadow, I am eager to learn more and more about what I amtrying to create.

Up until we moved here, I had thought more about woodland and woodland wildflowers, but with large open areas here that have attracted bluebirds, I expect to have much larger expanses of grassland and forbs than I would've originally expected. I've always wanted edge habitat and to include sun-loving natives, but now I'm seeing the meadow as an endangered habitat and am thrilled to do my own restoration project.

I will still have woodland--which was my first love and exposure to woodland wildflowers...but, I've come to really, really appreciate the grassland/meadow. I'm eager to see what birds I attract.

People have been told for years to plant trees as part of conservation--something that still needs to be promoted--but I think that idea is well rooted in the public eye...the native open habitats and all that they support have been largely ignored (at least here in the East) it seems to me.
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Old 12-28-2015, 06:05 AM   #9
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Chris Helzer at Prairie Ecologist with another's take on the importance of prairie.

Why Prairie Matters – A Guest Essay | The Prairie Ecologist

Quote:
WHY PRAIRIE MATTERS

by Doug Ladd

WHENEVER I AM IN A TALLGRASS PRAIRIE, I AM ASTOUNDED BY THE DIVERSITY AND COMPLEXITY SURROUNDING ME—uncounted numbers of organisms, interacting at multiple levels, both visible and invisible to the human eye, above and below ground, shaping and in turn being shaped by the physical environment. To visit a prairie is to be immersed in the result of thousands of generations of competition and natural selection resulting in a dynamic array of diversity, which, collectively, is supremely attuned to this uniquely midcontinental landscape.
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Old 01-01-2016, 05:15 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dapjwy View Post
Thanks for the link, Gloria. I opened it, but will have to view it later.

Now that I am finally making progress on smothering the existing vegetation for my native meadow, I am eager to learn more and more about what I amtrying to create.

Up until we moved here, I had thought more about woodland and woodland wildflowers, but with large open areas here that have attracted bluebirds, I expect to have much larger expanses of grassland and forbs than I would've originally expected.
I recall the open view from your hill top Dapjwy. It was very pretty.
We haven't a hill in sight being located in a glacial valley like we are so I find myself drawn to the hills, mountains and the movement of the downward spill of water.
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