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Old 05-21-2015, 06:56 PM   #1
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Default Our pollinator habitat

After many delays involving various bureaucratic weirdnesses, four intrepid student volunteers planted Phase One of a pollinator habitat at our college's recently-acquired farm. All plants and seeds came from either yours truly or a colleague, mostly harvested from our yards (with the exception of the black oil sunflower seed used to fill in the gaps and provide quick color). We had hoped to include milkweed in the original mix, but the milkweed seed a colleague harvested from the roadside failed to sprout, so we may order a few plants from Ion Xchange (or dig some from a drainage ditch before the state road people mow them down).

The denizens of our new habitat garden include the following:

  • blue-eyed grass
  • ruellia (not sure which of our two native species it is)
  • physocarpus (the straight species, dap)
  • thread-leaf coreopsis
  • rudbeckia hirta
  • obedient plant
  • echinacea
  • ratibida pinnata
  • liatris
  • cup plant (the offspring of my poor abused silphium)
  • rough-stemmed goldenrod
  • New England aster
  • aromatic aster
  • a tall white aster (probably Symphyotrichum lanceolatum)
  • lonicera sempervirens (for which we located trellis materials via some intelligent dumpster-diving)
We expect the bees (and the agriculture students) to be pleased with the eventual results.
Attached Thumbnails
Our pollinator habitat-img_5187.jpg   Our pollinator habitat-img_5203.jpg   Our pollinator habitat-finished-product.jpg  
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Old 05-21-2015, 09:18 PM   #2
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That is wonderful Rebek. How are things going at your home?
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Old 05-22-2015, 06:02 AM   #3
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I've not had time to do much--am very glad we put in the lawn strip bed last fall. Everything seems to have lived, and the monarda is about to bloom. The tulip bed (sorry, dap) included almost as an afterthought was a big hit--we had total strangers stopping to photograph it!

Right now, the necessary task is removing the nasties (English ivy, yellow flag iris, who-knows-what) from the sunken garden, but I am also getting the old property ready to sell--while battling the flu and getting ready for my poor hubby's upcoming back surgery. Never one thing. (Of course!)
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Old 05-22-2015, 04:14 PM   #4
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I've not had time to do much--am very glad we put in the lawn strip bed last fall. Everything seems to have lived, and the monarda is about to bloom. The tulip bed (sorry, dap) included almost as an afterthought was a big hit--we had total strangers stopping to photograph it!

Right now, the necessary task is removing the nasties (English ivy, yellow flag iris, who-knows-what) from the sunken garden, but I am also getting the old property ready to sell--while battling the flu and getting ready for my poor hubby's upcoming back surgery. Never one thing. (Of course!)
Oh my Rebek. You have a lot going on. Good luck with everything. Funny that you apologised to dap about tulips
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Old 05-30-2015, 10:04 PM   #5
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Beautiful spot.

Great list.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rebek56 View Post
The denizens of our new habitat garden include the following:
[LIST][*]blue-eyed grass[*]ruellia (not sure which of our two native species it is)[*]physocarpus (the straight species, dap)...
Good job! . (And thanks for the laugh.)

By the way the (straight species) physicalist i bough last year is blooming this year! I think I will really like this species.
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Old 05-30-2015, 10:10 PM   #6
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LOL! Tulips are not my favorite, I'll admit...but I've come to appreciate the deep red ones left by a previous owner--I still want to remove them, but I am considering making a planter with the bulbs I remove.

They are dormant already, I think. That is a good thing...so, I'm sure yours will go dormant as well--I just don't like the idea of them mixing with the woodland wildflowers...they just look so out of place to me with natives.

I'm glad you (and those stopping by) could enjoy them.
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Old 05-31-2015, 06:45 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dapjwy View Post
LOL! Tulips are not my favorite, I'll admit...but I've come to appreciate the deep red ones left by a previous owner--I still want to remove them, but I am considering making a planter with the bulbs I remove.

They are dormant already, I think. That is a good thing...so, I'm sure yours will go dormant as well--I just don't like the idea of them mixing with the woodland wildflowers...they just look so out of place to me with natives.

I'm glad you (and those stopping by) could enjoy them.
I still have tulips as well. Some left from the previous owner, some planted in my pre-native years, and a few "gifts" from neighbors via the squirrels that like to dig them up there and bring them HERE. Being of Dutch ancestry, I don't have the heart to dig them up and get rid of them but they get no special treatment either. I think a planter or two is a great idea. Maybe I'll try that at some point.
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Old 05-31-2015, 06:47 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rebek56 View Post
After many delays involving various bureaucratic weirdnesses, four intrepid student volunteers planted Phase One of a pollinator habitat at our college's recently-acquired farm. All plants and seeds came from either yours truly or a colleague, mostly harvested from our yards (with the exception of the black oil sunflower seed used to fill in the gaps and provide quick color). We had hoped to include milkweed in the original mix, but the milkweed seed a colleague harvested from the roadside failed to sprout, so we may order a few plants from Ion Xchange (or dig some from a drainage ditch before the state road people mow them down).

The denizens of our new habitat garden include the following:

  • blue-eyed grass
  • ruellia (not sure which of our two native species it is)
  • physocarpus (the straight species, dap)
  • thread-leaf coreopsis
  • rudbeckia hirta
  • obedient plant
  • echinacea
  • ratibida pinnata
  • liatris
  • cup plant (the offspring of my poor abused silphium)
  • rough-stemmed goldenrod
  • New England aster
  • aromatic aster
  • a tall white aster (probably Symphyotrichum lanceolatum)
  • lonicera sempervirens (for which we located trellis materials via some intelligent dumpster-diving)
We expect the bees (and the agriculture students) to be pleased with the eventual results.
What a great project, Rebek! I'm sure the bees, the students and even the bureaucratic weirdos will love the results!
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Old 05-31-2015, 07:25 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dapjwy View Post
LOL! Tulips are not my favorite, I'll admit--I just don't like the idea of them mixing with the woodland wildflowers...they just look so out of place to me with natives.

I'm glad you (and those stopping by) could enjoy them.
Our tulips are out in the sunny area near the busier street. The shady strip on the quiet street got some "Fragrant Rose" daffodils, wild geranium, pulmonaria, amsonia tabermontana, clethra, and chrysogonum--and some starts of physocarpus, of course.

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Old 06-11-2015, 10:05 AM   #10
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I'm glad you like the planter idea. I *think* I will too, but I won't really k ow until I make them....assuming I ever do. Being in a planter makes them seem more like a houseplant or cut flowers to me--separate from (and not infiltrating) my natural areas.

Really, I think the idea is mostly for Jeff who seems to dislike the notion of my just getting rid of them completely.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rebek56 View Post
Our tulips are out in the sunny area near the busier street. The shady strip on the quiet street got some "Fragrant Rose" daffodils, wild geranium, pulmonaria, amsonia tabermontana, clethra, and chrysogonum--and some starts of physocarpus, of course.

How about some photos?
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