Wildlife Gardeners - North American Wildlife Gardening  

Go Back   Wildlife Gardeners - North American Wildlife Gardening > Wildlife Gardeners of North America Unite > Biodiversity

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 10-13-2014, 11:26 AM   #31
WG Hospitality & UAOKA recipient
 
dapjwy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Pennsylvania
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rebek56 View Post
A maple died in the lawn strip near the street, so we have a roughly 12x20-foot spot in full sun to play with--not to mention room for physocarpus in another area.
I'm glad that you have a sunny area to play with. Nature creates open spaces and the sun-lovers fill in. I like the idea of having a lot of "edge habitat"--glad you have a place to create some.

(Sorry to highjack the tread. Now, back to our regularly scheduled programming. )
__________________
"If suburbia were landscaped with meadows, prairies, thickets or forests, or combinations of these, then the water would sparkle, fish would be good to eat again, birds would sing and human spirits would soar." ~ Lorrie Otto
~ A Native Backyard Blog ~
dapjwy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-13-2014, 08:07 PM   #32
Offical Silphium Abuser
 
Rebek56's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Southeast Ohio
Default

Uh-oh--I'm putting in a managed landscape (so we're back to Wilson after all).
__________________
"If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need." --Cicero

~http://rebeccas-window.blogspot.com/~
Rebek56 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-14-2014, 03:13 PM   #33
A Bee's Best Friend
 
Gloria's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Chicago Illinois USA
Default

NPR radio interview with E. O. Wilson about his book The Meaning Of Human Existence to listen to at link.

Tuesday, October 14, 2014

E.O. Wilson On ‘The Meaning Of Human Existence’ | Here & Now
__________________
"Half Earth Quest" Edward O. Wilson

http://pollinators-welcome.blogspot.com/
Gloria is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-10-2014, 03:03 PM   #34
A Bee's Best Friend
 
Gloria's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Chicago Illinois USA
Default

Altruism, social evolution? He goes not gentle into that good night...eh?

Why Richard Dawkins 'is not a scientist', the survival of the least selfish, and what ants tell us about humans - EO Wilson on his new book - Science - News - The Independent


Quote:
“The origin of the human condition is best explained by the natural selection for social interaction – the inherited propensities to communicate, recognise, evaluate, bond, co-operate, compete, and from all these the deep warm pleasure of belonging to your own special group,” he says. “Social intelligence enhanced by group selection made Homo sapiens the first fully dominant species in Earth’s history.”
But if ants could grow bigger, it might have been so different.
__________________
"Half Earth Quest" Edward O. Wilson

http://pollinators-welcome.blogspot.com/
Gloria is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-05-2014, 08:21 PM   #35
A Bee's Best Friend
 
Gloria's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Chicago Illinois USA
Default

Here is a link to an article that says much better than I have been able,how I feel, and why I keep coming back to this.

'New normal' approach to conservation comes under fire

Traditional approach

Quote:
Ecological restoration is the discipline that is traditionally applied in response to ecosystem degradation.
When natural habitats are threatened or damaged, especially by invasive species,
proponents of restoration invest resources and time into bringing them to their original state.
An example of this is the successful 1992 project in the Humboldt Bay National Wildlife Refuge, California,
to replace alien European beachgrass (Ammophila arenaria) and ice-plants (Carpobrotus edulis and C. chilensis) with native dune grass (Elymus mollis).
New approach (bulux...)
Quote:
"Novel ecosystems" first entered the conservation scene in 2006.
It operates under the assumption that many of the world's ecosystems are crossing ecological thresholds that result in permanent alteration.
These thresholds are known as the tipping points at which an ecosystem shifts to a permanently altered and stable state.
As such, instead of wasting resources vainly trying to restore such ecosystems, we should be looking for ways to appreciate them in their altered forms,
especially if they provide comparable ecosystem services. Since then, it has gained much attention and influence.
argument against Novel ecosystems and reason Wilson and many like myself fight this approach.
Quote:
"Often, the threshold that obstructs a restoration project
is not its ecological feasibility,
but its cost, and the political will to commit to such a cost,"
the authors write.
Read more at ...
http://news.mongabay.com/2014/1202-hong-novel-ecosystems.html


There is much more to it of course and more to learn but I agree with those who say it is justification not science that leads to the awful conclusions of some about the nature of conservation..

Quote:
Stick with restoration.
Advocates of the "novel ecosystems" approach are quick to label those who practice ecological restoration as sentimentalists not willing to face the reality of a changing world, yet Murcia pointed out that restoration is a tried and tested concept.
Her paper cites studies that have shown the effectiveness of many restoration projects.
Other research increasingly shows that investing in these projects also economically benefits society. Furthermore, there are scientific journals that focus explicitly on ecological restoration studies, such as Restoration Ecology and Ecological Management & Restoration
__________________
"Half Earth Quest" Edward O. Wilson

http://pollinators-welcome.blogspot.com/
Gloria is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-15-2014, 01:01 AM   #36
A Bee's Best Friend
 
Gloria's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Chicago Illinois USA
Default

Here is a bit more to digest.

Ecology and Society: Shifting Restoration Policy to Address Landscape Change, Novel Ecosystems, and Monitoring


Quote:
CONCLUSION
In the face of landscape changes at multiple scales, we recommend policy for setting restoration objectives and assessing outcomes within long-term adaptive restoration programs. Restorationists could then meet the challenges of altered conditions of our globe, watersheds, sites, and species. Policy would direct planners to be forward-thinking, able to identify constraints at multiple spatial scales, able to set targets that are potentially achievable, required to recognize when targets cannot be met, and able to adapt to landscape change. Adaptive restoration combines learning and restoring. First, planners set multiple, clear objectives. They propose alternative methods to achieve each target, then implement field experiments on-site and use specific standards to assess outcomes objectively. Experimentation allows project personnel to determine why key objectives were not achieved on schedule. Objectives that are judged unachievable are set aside, and alternative targets are explored and selected. Results are presented as degrees of progress, based on data, not subjective opinion.
http://www.fs.fed.us/global/iitf/pub...6_hobbs001.pdf

Quote:
1
Are novel ecosystems on the increase? Will such ecosystems
predominate at the end of the present century? What does this
mean for our attempts to conserve ‘wild’ or ‘natural’ ecosystems?
2
Do we need special concepts and methods to approach today’s
novel ecosystems or do they simply represent one quite typical
example of ecosystem dynamics that have always occurred?
3
Are new species combinations provoking ‘new’ ecosystem
functioning or properties? To what extent will a new combination
of species maintain similar functional properties with respect to
the old species pool (i.e. is there functional redundancy or are
new properties added)?
4
To what extent do these new species combinations alter the
original network of mutualistic and antagonistic interactions,
and what are the consequences for community organization?
5
Can we recognize thresholds in ecosystems and landscapes?
6
How do novel ecosystems affect the relative values of ‘natural’
and managed systems?
7
How does the concept of novel ecosystems relate to the marine
environment?
8
What are the important socio-economic aspects that need to
be considered in relation to novel ecosystems?
__________________
"Half Earth Quest" Edward O. Wilson

http://pollinators-welcome.blogspot.com/
Gloria is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-16-2014, 08:27 PM   #37
WG Hospitality & UAOKA recipient
 
dapjwy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Pennsylvania
Default

This is all a lot to digest...and it is depressing to think that these "novel ecosystems" can compare to the natural/native habitats that have existed for millennia. I didn't even like the idea of typing "ecosystem" in the first sentence...I can't view the degraded landscapes that I am seeing as an ecosystem.

Thank you for continuing to post about this topic.
__________________
"If suburbia were landscaped with meadows, prairies, thickets or forests, or combinations of these, then the water would sparkle, fish would be good to eat again, birds would sing and human spirits would soar." ~ Lorrie Otto
~ A Native Backyard Blog ~
dapjwy is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
the end of the anthropocene, wilson

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:01 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2