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Old 09-09-2014, 03:03 PM   #1
A Bee's Best Friend
 
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Default Bacteria from bees possible alternative to antibiotics

Nice to see a little good news on this front. An article well worth taking the time to check out.


Bacteria from bees possible alternative to antibiotics -- ScienceDaily

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Summary:

Thirteen lactic acid bacteria found in the honey stomach of bees have shown promising results in a series of studies. The group of bacteria counteracted antibiotic-resistant MRSA in lab experiments. The bacteria, mixed into honey, has healed horses with persistent wounds. The formula has previously been shown to protect against bee colony collapse.
1.Tobias C Olofsson, Èile Butler, Pawel Markowicz, Christina Lindholm, Lennart Larsson, Alejandra Vásquez. Lactic acid bacterial symbionts in honeybees - an unknown key to honey's antimicrobial and therapeutic activities. International Wound Journal, 2014; DOI: 10.1111/iwj.12345

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/1...46A5FD7.f04t03

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Abstract
Could honeybees' most valuable contribution to mankind besides pollination services be alternative tools against infections? Today, due to the emerging antibiotic-resistant pathogens, we are facing a new era of searching for alternative tools against infections. Natural products such as honey have been applied against human's infections for millennia without sufficient scientific evidence. A unique lactic acid bacterial (LAB) microbiota was discovered by us, which is in symbiosis with honeybees and present in large amounts in fresh honey across the world. This work investigates if the LAB symbionts are the source to the unknown factors contributing to honey's properties. Hence, we tested the LAB against severe wound pathogens such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Pseudomonas aeruginosa and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) among others. We demonstrate a strong antimicrobial activity from each symbiont and a synergistic effect, which counteracted all the tested pathogens. The mechanisms of action are partly shown by elucidating the production of active compounds such as proteins, fatty acids, anaesthetics, organic acids, volatiles and hydrogen peroxide. We show that the symbionts produce a myriad of active compounds that remain in variable amounts in mature honey. Further studies are now required to investigate if these symbionts have a potential in clinical applications as alternative tools against topical human and animal infections
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Old 09-09-2014, 03:14 PM   #2
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Maybe I should have posted this in news but the idea that these specific bacteria live in the gut of honey bees and have helped them fight off disease (until we started feeding them un-natural foods and exposing them to pesticides) seemed appropriate here in biodiversity. When we kill off species the ripple effect may be very broad indeed.
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