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Old 08-27-2014, 06:23 PM   #241
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Goldenrod is part of succession, and hosts the most insects of all native genus of herbaceous plants. Goldenrod usually comes in first because of the ease of germination, floating seeds, and less predation from mammalian herbivores. Then trees or grass come in and it becomes less persistent. This is why old fields of under-managed land gets filled with goldenrod, until native grasses or trees take over. Lack of natural grassland/forest near fields can also give rise to goldenrod, which can persist through heavy management.

Also goldenrod puts out allelopathy into the soil with prevents others from growing (even invasives), so this can be used partially as a management tool.

So don't be too worried about too much goldenrod, its all part of the process.

Blue Jay Barrens: Goldenrod Forest
Oh, I'm not very worried about it at all. As long as I make sure I increase biodiversity (with the native grasses, other forbs, and even some shrubs) while maintaining a good bit of goldenrod, I'm happy to have it.

I know it is part of natural succession...and the fact is, I will want the whole yard to be in various stages of succession--at the same time, some areas will be kept in early stages and never be allowed to grow back into forest (at least not while I'm here and able to do the maintenance). My goal is to make sure I keep prime real estate for the bluebirds--I always want them to have a home here to raise their young.

I have used goldenrod's alleopathy to my advantage--the goldenrod and one species of large white-flowered aster that I've yet to identify seem to be able to hold their own against the mugwort. When I "edit out" any of the mugwort that comes through, it gives the asters and goldenrod a chance to get ahead even faster.

Also, Douglas Tallamy has high on the list of hosting wildlife (as you stated), so I was surprised by Equil's comment. Like I said, I prefer it to the mugwort, want a fair amount of it anyway, and really enjoy seeing the myriad of insects that it attracts.

Go, goldenrod!
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Old 08-27-2014, 08:01 PM   #242
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I just read the Bluejay Barrens link.

I like the description of layers within the "goldenrod forest". I've seen the pollinators on the flowers, the galls in the stems, and even some moss at the base, but having the spleen wort fern would be a great addition. I'll keep an eye out for it, but I suspect it may occur after many years...or only in certain conditions--like barrens. My goldenrod is just in an abandon field.
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Old 08-27-2014, 08:32 PM   #243
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The one variety of goldenrod I have is especially beautiful. I have been watering it which I have never done before. It has been ignored until this year. I cut some tree branches the other day so it will get more light. I forgot about it. I can't wait until it blooms. I'll try to get some decent pictures. Not too good at that.
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Old 08-27-2014, 09:12 PM   #244
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I'm glad it will be blooming for you. I hope you get a good shot...but post whatever you you get.
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Old 08-28-2014, 05:53 PM   #245
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I could not get the color in my pictures until I shaded the subject. Thanks to rb for the tip. Obedience plant and ageratum.
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what's blooming now 2014-obedience.jpg   what's blooming now 2014-ageratum.jpg  
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Old 08-31-2014, 10:20 AM   #246
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Is anyone else's ageratum going crazy this year? Mine has had babies all over the place (good for next year's garden tour plant sale).
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Old 08-31-2014, 11:05 AM   #247
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My ageratum was newly planted in the spring Rebek. It has done well. I am watering it every day. Chance of rain tonight.
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Old 08-31-2014, 06:05 PM   #248
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Is anyone else's ageratum going crazy this year? Mine has had babies all over the place (good for next year's garden tour plant sale).
I put one in late last year, it seems to have perished. I was a bit concerned I was a little north of its range...so, my thought last year was if it doesn't make it, it is not meant to be here. ...Strange, though, I almost want to give it another chance.

I'm glad it is doing so well for you. Is there a thread where you are talking about the garden tour plant sale? This is the first I've heard of it, and I'm intrigued.
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Old 09-01-2014, 06:14 AM   #249
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Quote: " Is there a thread where you are talking about the garden tour plant sale? This is the first I've heard of it, and I'm intrigued."

Probably not. It's a Marietta, Ohio, church fundraising event, and one not focused on native plants, although we generally have at least one garden with a lot of natives. I've worked the donated plant sale for the last ten years or so (and have done most of the publicity for the last two years), and we have been able to do a lot of educating about native plants while selling. Here is the link to the 2014 event's Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/mariettagardentour?ref=hl. I posted my photos of the gardens on the FB page, and there's a link to a gallery of day-of-tour photos.
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Old 09-01-2014, 06:43 AM   #250
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Nice gardens Rebek.
The Unitarian Church sounds like a good place to promote native plants.
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