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Old 06-16-2013, 05:06 PM   #51
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Don't forget to vote for "Wildlife Gardeners Top 10 Favorite Endangered Invertebrate Species".

Vote here "Wildlife Gardeners Top 10 Favorite Endangered Invertebrate Species".
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Old 06-16-2013, 05:28 PM   #52
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I have compiled a few links and some data on the species where links to the Federal Fish and Wildlife, and The Endangered Species sites are down. Hope this helps you decide which invertebrate species deserve a vote.

2. Beaver Cave beetle (Pseudanophthalmus major)

Findings on petitions, etc..—; Beaver cave beetle,
So much information here. I hope this link remains open.
Quote:
Species Information
The Beaver Cave beetle (Pseudanophthalmus major) was described by Krekeler (1973) from 3 specimens collected from Beaver Cave, Harrison County, Kentucky by T.C. Barr and J.R. Holsinger in 1966. Cave beetles in the genus Pseudanophthalmus are small, eyeless, reddishbrown insects that belong to the predatory ground beetle family Carabidae. Like most other insects, they have six legs and a body that consists of a head, thorax, and abdomen. Body length is generally from 3.0 to 8.0 millimeters (mm) (0.12 to 0.32 inches), depending upon the species. Maximum body length for the Beaver Cave beetle is 8 mm. According to Barr (1996), the genus Pseudanophthalmus is represented by approximately 255 species. The different species within the genus are differentiated by differences in the shape and size of the various body parts, especially the shape of the male appendages used during reproduction. Most members of the genus are cave dependent (troglobites) and are not found outside the cave environment. All are predatory and feed upon small cave invertebrates such as spiders, mites, millipedes, and diplurans, while the larger Pseudanophthalmus species also feed on cave cricket eggs (Barr 1996).
Quote:
The Beaver Cave beetle is restricted to Beaver Cave, a limestone cave located in the Bluegrass Region of central Kentucky. There are no other caves in the vicinity of Beaver Cave, and the Beaver cave beetle has not been found at any other locations. The only known entrance to Beaver Cave is located in an open pasture and hillside of a dairy farm in eastern Harrison County. The cave generally trends northeastward from its entrance for approximately 350 meters before terminating in a breakdown (i.e., a portion of the cave where the ceiling has collapsed) (Laudermilk 2006). Most of Beaver Cave is comprised of a simple, narrow passage approximately 1 meter wide and 2.5 meters high. However, there are several larger rooms present, and there are multiple levels in a few places (Laudermilk 2006). A more extensive description of the cave can be found in Barr (1996).
[[Page 597
Quote:
Although the Beaver Cave beetle is listed as endangered in Kentucky by the Kentucky State Nature Preserves Commission, such listings provide no substantive protection under the current Kentucky law. However, there are no foreseeable reasons why specific regulatory mechanisms are necessary to ensure the conservation of this species, because the landowner and the involved agencies have committed to and are implementing various conservation efforts to protect Beaver Cave and the Beaver Cave beetle. These include, but are not limited to, strictly controlling access to the cave and the property surrounding the cave opening and restoring and enhancing the vegetation communities surrounding the cave and in its watershed. The metal gate is effective in preventing unauthorized entry into the cave, and as described above, the landowner has committed to and is implementing measures to strictly control access to the cave. Based on these considerations, the inadequacy of existing regulatory mechanisms is not a threat to the species.
5.Greater Adams Cave Beetle (Pseudanophthalmus pholeter)
6. Lesser Adams Cave Beetle (Pseudanophthalmus cataryctos)
Quote:
About the size of pencil erasers, the cave-dependent greater (Pseudanophthalmus pholeter) and lesser (Pseudanophthalmus cataryctos) Adams Cave beetles are reddish-brown eyeless predators of spiders, mites, and millipedes
The agreement specified the need to restore native vegetation surrounding the cave entrance, and re-establish natural airflow and inputs of organic debris that form the basis of the cave’s food chain. The Wildlife Society’s Eastern Kentucky University Student Chapter also removed trash from Adams Cave and replaced a damaged cinder block wall – with a bat-friendly steel gate – at its only entrance to minimize disturbance, and the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources helped restore the woodland savannah area surrounding the cave. These efforts resulted in the removal of both species from the federal candidate list in December 2005
8. Surprising cave beetle (Pseudanophthalmus inexpectatus)
Quote:
The surprising cave beetle (Pseudanophthalmus inexpectatus) measures just over one-eighth of an inch long, or about the thickness of two quarters stacked on top of each other.
22.Spruce-Fir Moss spider (Microhexura montivaga)
http://www.enr.state.nc.us/NaturalHe.../Images/69.pdf

Quote:
Life History: The spider constructs its tube-shaped webs in
the interface between the moss mat and rock surface, occasionally
extending the web into the interior of the moss mat.
Although there are no records of prey being found in the
webs, the species has been observed taking prey in the wild.
The abundant springtails in the moss mats provide the most
likely source of food for the spider. Males of the species
mature during September and October, and females lay eggs
in June. The thin-walled, transparent egg sac may contain
seven to nine eggs. The female remains with the egg sac and
will carry it with her fangs if disturbed. Spiderlings emerge
in September. It is estimated that it may take three years for
the species to reach maturity.
Quote:
Habitat: The spruce-fir moss spider is found in damp but
well-drained moss and liverwort mats growing on rocks or
boulders and in well-shaded areas of mature, high-elevation
Fraser fir and fir dominated spruce-fir forests. The moss mats
cannot be too dry, as the species is very sensitive to desiccation,
or too wet because large drops of water pose a threat to
the spider.
Let's hope the Fish and Wildlife issues are resolved and the links posted become available again. Such information is valuble to the public.
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Old 06-17-2013, 11:07 AM   #53
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Yea!!! All the U.S. Fish and Wildlife websites and links are working again. Don't know what the problem was but this morning all is well. All links on this thread are working again...
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Old 06-18-2013, 07:32 PM   #54
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Gloria....... You're sure doing a great job locating and presenting the info for the gang.
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Old 06-19-2013, 01:32 PM   #55
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An article at Discover Magazine from 1997 is still very relevant to this discussion about endangered invertebrate species. Some good information on the mussels we have read about but also some thoughts on other endangered endemic species, a category to which many endangered invertebrate species belong.

Mass Extinctions Come to Ohio | DiscoverMagazine.com

Quote:
Neither of the two previously known populations was breeding, so even though an individual catspaw can live 30 years, the creature’s days as a species seemed numbered. Hoggarth’s population is breeding, however, and in a single day he has raised its estimated number by 7 percent. His discovery raises the catspaw’s chances of survival from nil to merely bleak.
Quote:
The story of the purple catspaw is not unusual for unionoid mussels. Humans have trashed them unwittingly but with a terrifying thoroughness. These filter feeders were buried in agricultural silt, drowned by dams, and poisoned by pollution. Their beds were dredged up for the river gravel beneath their feet. These same disturbances also wiped out populations of the fish on which the larvae of unionoids must mature. The mussels became a commodity in a ruinous shell trade, first for pearl buttons, then, in recent decades, for seeds--plugs cut from the shell that are used for culturing artificial pearls. They survived one exotic invasion by the Asian clam in 1859, only to face a new and possibly more damaging alien European competitor, the infamous zebra mussel.
Quote:
In his tour of global extinctions, Pimm realized that the purple catspaw and other threatened species are more often than not endemics--and that endemics held the key to explaining the diversity crisis. A lot of people start to say, ‘It’s just Hawaii. It’s just Hawaiian birds. You’re just looking at something special,’ says Pimm. And I quickly began to realize that wasn’t true. What unites all these extinction hot spots, whether it’s fish in these rivers, clams in these rivers, or flowering plants in South Africa, is not that they are all growing on islands--the Mississippi valley is manifestly not an island--but the high levels of endemism. They happen to be species with small ranges, and they are uniquely vulnerable.
Quote:
In a world of 100 million species, the possible loss of 161 North American freshwater mussels may not seem large. But that loss--more than half the known species on the continent gone in only 300 years--is a regional catastrophe, and one that is duplicated by other animals and plants many times around the world. That’s a staggering thought, almost like stepping backward from the Killbuck Creek’s shallows into deeper water and having the strong current unexpectedly grab you around the middle. Even in this placid farmers’ river, you can’t help shuddering in a moment of fear.
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Old 06-20-2013, 11:07 AM   #56
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Does anyone think we should extend the vote time by a couple of weeks?
If not we have until Monday,busy with a family affair this weekend.
Either way vote for your favorite endangered invertebrates soon. This tally will stand for us all...use your voice!!!
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Old 06-24-2013, 03:56 PM   #57
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This has been a really fun thread. Learned so much about the partnerships formed to save these animals and how beneficial that has been to all party's concerned. There is so much to do and so little understanding of what must be done. But at least there are concerned,dedicated people trying to make things happen. It gives me some hope!
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Old 06-25-2013, 11:23 AM   #58
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I saw this beautiful picture of the purple cat's paw mussel on the endangered species site and had to share with you.



http://www.fws.gov/endangered/map/ESA_success_stories/OH/OH_story3/index.html


Quote:
Earlier this year, biologist pulled the cages and transported the 10 female mussels to the Columbus Zoo and Aquarium's Freshwater Mussel Conservation and Research Center. At the zoo, biologists found that six of the mussels carried glochidia. The partners in purple cat's paw recovery1 hold the mussels at three separate propagation facilities2 to avoid a single accident or mistake wiping out the entire batch of glochidia
Quote:
Freshwater mussels have an unusual and complex method of reproduction. Female mussels release glochidia directly into the water and the glochidia must attach to the gills or fins of a specific host fish species to complete development. After attaching, glochidia transform into microscopic-sized juveniles within a few weeks and then drop off the fish.
At each propagation facility, biologists have extracted glochidia from the purple cat's paw mussels and placed them in containers with host fish. Biologists are now waiting to see if viable juvenile mussels drop from the host fish. The very existence of the purple cat's paw are riding on the success of this effort
Attached Thumbnails
Top 10 favorite endangered invertebrate species.-cats-paw-pearly-mussel.jpg  
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Old 06-27-2013, 02:52 AM   #59
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The Wildlife Gardeners' Top Ten Favorite Endangered Invertebrate Species have been announced.

Announcing Wildlife Gardeners' Top Ten Favorite Endangered Invertebrate Species.
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Old 07-24-2013, 11:19 PM   #60
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Thought you might like to see a picture of the Nashville crawfish at Endangered Species - Stories from Tennessee.Endangered Species | Map | State


And a video of a search for the spruce-fir moss spider .

Endangered Species Program | What We Do | Partnership Stories | Knoxnews.com/Knoxville News Sentinel (Kentucky)


Quote:
Meet the Nashville crayfish, unique to Tennessee.
The Nashville crayfish lives only in the Mill Creek Basin in the southwestern part of the state.
To learn more about threatened and endangered plants and wildlife in Tennessee visit: Endangered Species | Map | State
Attached Thumbnails
Top 10 favorite endangered invertebrate species.-66737_614925361873755_105742498_n-1-.jpg  
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