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Old 05-27-2013, 11:27 AM   #21
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liquidamber, that is an unusual creature you have brought to our attention. Seems it has made itself at home the world over. I don't think that it is native to north america but the first recorded sighting here was in 1880 so it has been here some time. As for size, the average adult is about the size of a penny to 1 inch in diameter. But it goes through several life stages, a polyp phase, a larva phase, eggs, and the most familiar, the medusa (the one that looks like a jellyfish).

freshwater jellyfish (Craspedacusta sowerbyi) - FactSheet

Craspedacusta sowerbii is a freshwater jellyfish in the phylum Cnidaria. Since it is classified as a hydrozoan, it is one of many jellyfish that are also known as hydromedusae.

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Status: Craspedacusta sowerbyi is apparently established throughout most of the United States. Since the first record in 1880, it has been recorded in 44 states and the District of Columbia (Pennak, 1989; DeVries, 1992; Peard, 2002). In Colorado, only two populations have been reported, so the species may not be established there (Pennak, 1956; DeVries, 1992; Peard, 2009). The presence of C. sowerbyi in Maui, Hawaii was confirmed in 1938, however its status in Hawaii is unknown. There have been no documented observations of C. sowerbyi in Hawaii for at least 15 years (Edmondson, 1940; Eldredge, personal communication 2002).
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Impact of Introduction: The impact of this widespread jellyfish is unclear. Dodson and Cooper (1983) proposed Craspedacusta sowerbyi's preference for predatory zooplankton, such as the rotifer Asplanchna, could influence relative zooplankton species structure. Spadinger and Maier (1999) agreed with theorized affects on zooplankton communities finding that C. sowerbyi hydromedusae prefer larger zooplankton (0.4–1.4 mm) and vigorous prey such as copepods. Under laboratory conditions and in 4 mm of water, C. sowerbyi polyps apparently killed and fed on striped bass larvae (Dendy, 1978). Dumont (1994) speculated that C. sowerbyi may consume fish eggs, but Spadinger and Maier (1999) note that it is generally not considered an important predator of eggs or small fish . Crayfish are considered the only important predator of the hydromedusa phase (Pennak, 1989; Slobodkin and Bossert, 1991).
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Old 05-27-2013, 12:32 PM   #22
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So, Gloria we never had a native one?
It was never rare?
That what I saw in the fall of the year - the tiny ones in the river did not need iron in the water?

Darn, I think I wasted all my time in school.
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Old 05-27-2013, 01:27 PM   #23
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liquidamber, I can not say if you are speaking of a different species. This is not a good weekend to check with someone that might have an answer to your question but I will seek answers next week at the university. A kentucky university might have knowledge of a local species you deemed jellyfish.
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Old 05-27-2013, 01:40 PM   #24
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Endangered Species | Map

Endangered Species Program | What We Do | Partnership Stories | Northern Riffleshell

Restoring the Northern Riffleshell; Allegheny River, Pennsylvania

Species Profile for Caseys June Beetle (Dinacoma caseyi)

Casey's June Beetle, Palm Canyon Wash Palm Springs California
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Old 05-27-2013, 02:26 PM   #25
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Has anyone seen a Franklin's bumble bee? News OPB
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Old 05-28-2013, 09:54 AM   #26
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Don't forget to add your choice for favorite endangered species. If you "favor" some of the already mentioned species let us know.
I will be listing a few endangered invertebrate as I find them.

If a species was on the official endangered list but then de-listed it still deservers mention...in my opinion.
Like these stellar beetles from caves in Kentucky.

Endangered Species | ESA Success Story

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About the size of pencil erasers, the cave-dependent greater (Pseudanophthalmus pholeter) and lesser (Pseudanophthalmus cataryctos) Adams Cave beetles are reddish-brown eyeless predators of spiders, mites, and millipedes
The agreement specified the need to restore native vegetation surrounding the cave entrance, and re-establish natural airflow and inputs of organic debris that form the basis of the cave’s food chain. The Wildlife Society’s Eastern Kentucky University Student Chapter also removed trash from Adams Cave and replaced a damaged cinder block wall – with a bat-friendly steel gate – at its only entrance to minimize disturbance, and the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources helped restore the woodland savannah area surrounding the cave. These efforts resulted in the removal of both species from the federal candidate list in December 2005
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The Beaver Cave beetle (Pseudanophthalmus major) only lives in one cave on a 60-acre (24-hectare) dairy farm.
To reduce sediment and animal waste within the cave’s watershed, partners installed a fence and established a forested buffer around the stream and cave to alleviate livestock effects.
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The surprising cave beetle (Pseudanophthalmus inexpectatus) measures just over one-eighth of an inch long, or about the thickness of two quarters stacked on top of each other.
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Old 05-29-2013, 03:44 PM   #27
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Not generating much interest in nominating these awesome creatures am I. Any suggestions on bringing some appeal to the quest?

Equil spoke of a mistake with a snail but this little one has its bonafides.

Chittenango ovate amber snails (Succinea chittenangoensis)
are unique to the Empire State—you won’t find them anywhere else in the world.

Protecting New York’s thumbnail-sized snail | U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Northeast Region

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While similar fossil shells have been found as far north as Ontario, Canada and as far west as Tennessee and Iowa, the only known living population of these small snails is at the edge of this waterfall in Chittenango Falls State Park.
Endangered Species Program | About Us | Featured Species: Chittenango Ovate Amber Snail
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Old 05-30-2013, 08:48 AM   #28
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Here's another interesting creature!
Species Profile for Kentucky Cave shrimp (Palaemonias ganteri)
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Old 05-30-2013, 12:48 PM   #29
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Recurve Kentucky seems to have a number of interesting invertebrate.
The best way to see to the conservation of these species is to help their habitat recover to a healthy ecosystem. That usually means many other species are helped as well. It is never just one species at risk but some species show deterioration more quickly and if we heed these warnings, fiqure out what can be done and then do what it takes, everyone benefits.
Here is a link to the USGS Scientific Investigations Report 2008-5023
that affects the well being of the Kentucky Cave Shrimp and many others. The lock and dam are no longer used for the original intent and it is degrading but will cost to remove and other uses must be addressed. A solution is found and money for the endangered species will help local authorities do the job.

USGS Scientific Investigations Report 2008-5023

NATURAL RESOURCES AND KARST ECOSYSTEMS
Effects of Lock and Dam Number Six on Aquatic Ecosystems in Mammoth Cave Mammoth Cave National Park, P.O. Box 7, Mammoth Cave, KY 42259

Quote:
Figure 1. The Kentucky Cave Shrimp (Palaemonias ganteri) is found only in the Mammoth Cave vicinity and is listed as endangered. Habitat degradation due to the Lock and Dam No. 6 impoundment is considered a prime causative factor in the decline of this species. (Photo courtesy of Chip Clark)
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There are many reasons to remove the dam and preserve the lock at Brownsville. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has concluded that habitat for seven aquatic endangered species, six mussels and the Kentucky Cave Shrimp, will be restored. As well, conditions for many species in decline can be improved, and future listings prevented. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has agreed that such restoration is the best option for the needs of both wildlife and people, and that removal of the dam is the best way to save the lock from being undermined and destabilized.
I am wondering how many of these projects have been stopped by the sequestration fund restrictions?
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Old 05-31-2013, 12:36 PM   #30
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Today and tomorrow are your last chance to nominate an invertebrate species for the "Wildlife Gardeners Top 10 Favorite Endangered Invertebrate Species List". Give me a couple of days to organize the species in a way that is accessible. Then you may decide which 10 belong on favorite list. You may just list the 10 you want to see but if your choices are not getting enough votes then give us a bit of information that might sway more votes. So yes, you may campaign for your choices, or not, if you prefer to leave it to chance. LOL.
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