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Old 05-23-2013, 03:02 PM   #11
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I think the spring equinox is March 22nd and June 22nd is the Summer Solstice.

Apparently very little is known about the Nashville Crayfish so I'll go with this Tennessee native

In the Northern Latitudes the days start getting longer at the spring equinox and by the summer solstice we have equal parts of daytime hours and night hours. 12 hours each. Then after the summer solstice the days start getting shorter. Then in December we have the longest night on December 22nd the winter solstice.
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Old 05-23-2013, 03:29 PM   #12
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sprucetree,thank you.
Summer Soltice, June 22 ,would be what I should have said.

Nashville crawfish sounds cool. Who would have imagined Tennessee to have 78 different species of crawfish.
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Old 05-23-2013, 03:38 PM   #13
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A round of applause to the Administration...yeah!!!
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Old 05-24-2013, 10:13 AM   #14
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Really great idea for a thread!!! I read something a while ago on an invasive species that ended up on our endangered species list that I’m gonna try to find just because it’s so sad with so many “worthy” contenders that so much $$$ went to protecting it but…. I did have fun looking up what’s endangered on a list, Listed animals. Soooo now that I blew off the last hour or so looking up photos and brief descriptions of endangered bugs when I shoulda been outside….I’m gonna nominate some beetles because they interest me more than clams and…. I guess simple minded me just likes the “paint jobs” they’ve got…. Cicindela dorsalis, Cicindela dorsalis - Bing Images, and Nicrophorus americanus, Nicrophorus americanus - Bing Images, and Polyphylla barbata, Polyphylla barbata - Bing Images. Yaa…. I know…. pretty shallow nominating based on “looks” but…. I wasn’t really all that familiar with hardly any of the insects on the list and think it’d be easier elevating a beetle with a decent paint job to “celebrity” status in the public’s eyes than say…. a clam.
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Old 05-24-2013, 10:48 AM   #15
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Took me a while….here it is since…. the story of how an introduced invertebrate ended up on our endangered species list because I REALLY like this thread and would REALLY like to see more of our $$$ rerouted to the protection of any of the species Gloria’s giving props to, ‘Red Flags, Water Resources, and Physa natricina’, Freshwater Gastropods of North America: Red Flags, Water Resources, and Physa natricina, “This past December brought the publication of a brief paper by our colleagues Christopher Rogers and Amy Wethington synonymizing the federally listed “Snake River Physa” (Physa natricina) under the cosmopolitan P. acuta (1). How a local population of an invasive pest came to be protected under the Endangered Species Act is but one blunder in the sad history of fumbles and missteps that has characterized the record of American Malacology in the Snake River Canyon of southern Idaho. Can anything be learned to prevent such embarrassments in the future? The misadventure began in the early 1980s, when Idaho Power Company proposed the construction of six new hydroelectric projects on the middle Snake River, perhaps to impound the last free-flowing reaches of a 122 mile section already tightly controlled by 11 dams. Environmental groups rose up in opposition (2), and I would freely confess sympathy for their cause. I have a visceral love of rivers and the lotic biota, and hate impoundments because they are ugly, stinking blights, all too rapidly infested with Bud-swilling bass fishermen. But insults to the public aesthetic will never be as compelling to the permitting agencies as hydropower, irrigation, and jobs, no matter how egregious the choice of beer…. Science is a self-correcting process. It is gratifying to see two of our own, Rogers and Wethington, designing the research program and publishing the paper that has turned us back from our 20-year blunder. But at such a cost! Literally millions of dollars have been wasted monitoring, managing, and protecting a snail that anyone on six continents could find in the ditch behind his local McDonalds, licking special sauce off the hamburger wrappers.” Sorta makes threads like Gloria’s even more important in the bigger scheme of things doesn’t it>>>?
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Old 05-26-2013, 10:35 AM   #16
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Thanks Equal, you always find interesting stuff. How an insect looks is a good way to identify native invertebrate as opposed to non native invertebrate.

A bit of reading about endangered invertebrate.

Insects & Other Species - NYS Dept. of Environmental Conservation

Quote:
Invertebrates are animals without a spinal column (backbone). They include marine species such as sponges, jellyfish, sea urchins and starfish, freshwater aquatic species such as snails and mussels, and terrestrial species like insects, spiders and worms.
The Xerces Society Endangered Invertebrates – A Case For Attention To Invertebrate Conservation

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Invertebrates—butterflies, beetles, bees, ants, dragonflies, spiders, snails, lobsters, and starfish, to name but a few—are at the heart of a healthy environment, vital to life as we know it. They build the stunning coral reefs of our oceans, give color to the sparkling fields of springtime wildflowers while providing the service of pollination, break down enormous amounts of organic waste, and serve as food for countless other animals. There is no denying the importance of invertebrates to our ecosystem. Even so, “at risk” invertebrates are often overlooked in land-management decisions. The problem arises because land managers, conservationists, the general public, and even many scientists do not act as advocates for endangered invertebrates. Additionally, because of limitations on funding and the prioritization of efforts to protect more charismatic species, agencies often overlook the specific needs of invertebrates.
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Ultimately, to protect any species one must protect its habitat. Some invertebrates only need small areas to thrive, and even backyard gardens may help some pollinator insects.
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Old 05-26-2013, 10:59 AM   #17
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You will like this video. A deadly love story and a lesson in why this beetle has it tough these days. Can you imagine a dead creature being left to the wilds in a suburban/urban space. Horrors...

Burying Beetle - YouTube



A couple of more to see the beetles in a better light.

http://youtu.be/H75rJGLaSNk


http://youtu.be/tgCrcRLZAhc
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Old 05-26-2013, 05:15 PM   #18
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What can bringing attention to an endangered invertebrate species do to help that species and others?

Hine's emerald dragonfly


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Following years of unnecessary delays, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service listed the Hine’s emerald dragonfly as an endangered species in 1995 — making it the only dragonfly on the entire endangered species list. The Service chose not to protect the dragonfly’s habitat, claiming it lacked necessary scientific knowledge about the species.
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In 2004 the Center, leading a coalition of regional environmental groups, filed a lawsuit to stand up for the Hine’s emerald dragonfly. We won a court order forcing the Service, at long last, to designate critical habitat
Still dragging its feet, the agency eventually proposed the habitat designation nearly two years later, but then slashed the total area by more than half when it finalized the designation in 2007. The next year, we and our allies sued the Service over its decision to exclude national forest lands in Michigan and Missouri from the dragonfly’s critical habitat — and in 2010, our efforts paid off when the agency added those lands, doubling the protected area.
Who would nominate the 'HINES EMERALD DRAGONFLY' to the Wildlife Gardeners TOP 10 ENDANGERED INVERTEBRATE SPECIES LIST????
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Old 05-26-2013, 10:47 PM   #19
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Well; I guess this would be a clam - heee, heee, not an insect- but I am going to go with it anyway.
It sounds bout as good as the heel splitter.

It is the purple cat's paw.
The Cumberland River basin - well I guess the Ohio River Basin too, has more species of mussels than anywhere else in the world.
I am so proud!

The purple cat's Paw - the inside - mother of pearl is purple, and it is rare.

Horse Lick Creek comes out of caves and is not prone to so much slit and that is why the purple cat's paw has done well in this area. Tthe National Forest Service bought up all the land in that area to protect it.
Well. it was one reason why they bought all the land that surrounds the creek.

But then I like the fresh water jellyfish - it is only found in 10 areas of the world and Rockcastle River is one of them. The fresh water jelly fish like iron in it's water.

Here is a U tube some one took of one. It looks bigger in the U tube than I remember it -- I remember it being no bigger than a pencil eraser.

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Old 05-27-2013, 08:38 AM   #20
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While looking up the above U tube. I know it is hard to tell how small something is by camera - still it seemed way to big from what I remember. Even with my young eyes as a teenager you could barely make them out.

I found them in the river in the Fall and one year I took them to the biology teacher, who was delighted to get them. He said they were rare, and loved showing them to our class.

I know that in the biology text books when I was in high school they said it was rare too, and had a map of the United States and just a few places were marked were they existed - all places had a certain amount of iron in the water.

While I was looking on the internet, I found maps that showed where they are found now and it is all over the United States!

So I looked a bit further on the internet, and I believe we have been invaded!

They are also saying they are found in quarries, and ponds, and any still body of water.. The ones I use to see in the fall of the year were in the river - and a very swift moving river at that . I found them right below or above the rapids - of the river - that thrill seekers came from all over to go down.

I can't seem to find if we had a native species or not?

However: I found one researcher on the internet, that said these fresh water jelly fish or hydras came from China.

I am wondering if what I found in the video above is an invasion of China.

Does anyone know then if we have a native species? Surely we did?
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