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Old 08-31-2010, 10:16 AM   #1
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Default Aquatic invaders can topple plant and fish populations in Northeast

Aquatic invaders can topple plant and fish populations in Northeast
August 27, 2010
PhysOrg
Provided by Pennsylvania State University

Aquatic invaders can topple plant and fish populations in Northeast
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"Our efforts are aimed at education, because prevention is the best weapon we have against spreading these things," she said. One of the best strategies, according to Oleson, is to understand the pathways of introduction for various invasives. Sometimes the pathways of introduction are paved with good intentions. Well-meaning pet owners may not wish to destroy an animal that has gotten too big to keep, and they may turn it loose in the wild, not realizing that the introduced species has no natural predators in its new habitat. "Lionfish off the Atlantic coast and Burmese pythons in the Everglades are doing just fine, thank you very much," said Oleson.

Snakeheads may have been spread through the aquarium trade, she noted. Young snakeheads are available at pet stores, and if the fish get too big for a tank, they may be dumped inappropriately. Certain plant materials, such hydrilla, parrot feather and yellow floating heart also are sold as ornamental plants for aquariums or water gardens. "They're fine when they stay in the water garden, but they're not fine when they get out," she said.

Snakeheads may have been introduced from the live seafood trade...
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Old 10-05-2010, 04:23 PM   #2
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Default Limiting lionfish

Limiting lionfish
Divers capture 534 of invasive species in first derby to lower numbers in Keys
Updated: September 16, 2010, 2:34 PM ET

Divers capture 534 lionfish - ESPN
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KEY LARGO, Fla. -- More than 100 divers submerged Saturday to collect 534 Indo-Pacific red lionfish during the initial concerted effort to reduce the population of the invasive species in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary.
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Released alive into Atlantic waters by unsuspecting aquarists, lionfish have no known predators, except man, said Lad Akins of the Reef Environmental Education Foundation, who is coordinating the derbies in partnership with sanctuary officials...
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