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Old 09-05-2009, 03:27 PM   #1
hazelnut
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Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Greensboro, Alabama USA
Default The Native Roses of North America

Part II

PROPAGATION


Very rarely are native roses offered for sale as plants. One supplier is Wallace W. Hansen's Northwest Native Plants.

Native roses do not transplant readily, so it is not wise to dig up native roses from the wild. The rose is not likely to live under these circumstances, and you could be destroying the last of a rare or endangered species.

You could try growing the rose from a small cutting, if you can't find the plant commercially, but most varieties propagate readily from seed. The seeds are cold stratified, or wintersown. It may take up to two years to raise the seedling to a flowering plant so patience is required. Here is one method suggested by Albert Ford, editor, of the Maryland Rose Society newsletter. He places the seeds in film cannisters and refrigerates them for the required time, before planting in trays.
 
REFERENCES:
KEYS TO LINKS:
CNR. California Native Roses. Barbara Ertter.
ucjeps.berkeley.edu
The Connecticut Botanical Society. ct-botanical-society.org.
HMF. Help Me Find My Rose
helpmefind.com.
LBJWFC. Native Plant Database. Ladybird Johnson Wildflower Center. The university of Texas at Austin.
wildflower.org
USDA. NRCS. United States Department of Agriculture. National Resource Conservation Service. Plant Database. #HYPERLINK "http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=ROSA5"# HYPERLINK "http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=ROSA5"Plants.usda.gov ROSA 5
 
REFERENCES CITED:
[1] Wild Ones. Wisconsin's Best Native Plants for Attracting Birds. for-wild.org
[2] Alaska promotional statement. (Rosa acicularis). http://www.alaska-in-pictures.com/prickly-rose-flowers-anchorage-alaska-8861-pictures.htm
[3] Barbara Ertter. 2001. Native California Roses. Prepared for the Jepson Manual: Higher Plants of California. ucjeps.berkeley.edu
[4] Joly, Simon and Ann Bruneau. 2007. Delimiting Species boundaries in Rosa Sect. Cinnamomeae (Rosaceae) in eastern North America. Systematic Botany. Vol 32, No. 4, Oct. 2007. Published by American Society of Plant Taxonomists. ingentaconnect.com.
[5] The University of Michigan Ethnobotany database. http://herb.umd.umich.edu/
[6] H. Lewis. 1958 (Printed 1959) The Southwestern Naturalist 3:145-153. A Monograph of the Genus Rosa In North America. II. R. Foliolosa.
[7] Rosa blanda 'Traverse' is commercially available from the Oikos Tree Company.
 
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