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Old 04-10-2009, 09:50 PM   #1
TheLorax
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Join Date: Nov 2008
Default a yahoo group for wildlife gardeners

Everyone of us has friends that forward things to us in e-mail. This one here is one that saddens me but it is so illustrative of why we have such a big problem with some cat owners not keeping their cats inside. I removed everything like e-mail addresses and names but supposedly this is an actual posting to a yahoo group and not one person in this yahoo group risked hurting this woman's feelings by telling her to keep her cat inside. One of them all but patted her on the back for giving it a second chance. Some second chance. I think most of us know that even though the bat wasn't bleeding her cat probably killed it because of the bacteria in its mouth. Cats aren't exactly soft mouthed like a trained retriever. I tried to check out if this was for real or not and couldn't because it was for members only. Depressing a wildlife group is accepting cats as wildlife if this exchange is for real.

From:
Date: 4/07/2009 6:48:28 PM
To:
Subject: Fw: This is a yahoo wildlife group. They call themselves gardening4funandwildlife

1a.
Re: a cat with a bat
Posted by:
Mon Apr 6, 2009 11:04 am (PDT)

a cat with a batOh well done xxxxx, you gave the little bat another chance! I remember finding one that was unfortunately already dead, a few years ago now I cant remember whether it was a cat or the cold that killed it...but I do remember its little hands, that was the saddest thing, its little hands, like little baby's hands..
xxxxxx
----- Original Message -----
From:
To: gardening4funandwildlife@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Monday, April 06, 2009 5:44 PM
Subject: [gardening4funandwildlife] a cat with a bat

A strange thing happened a couple of days ago. I saw Bow playing with something that looked like a bird. I dashed out to hopefully save it and low and behold it was a little brown bat! I convinced her to drop it and proceeded to coax it onto a board and helped it up on a tree. This was the snag we kept from the tree that fell two summers ago. It is about 60 feet tall and the little bat climbed all the way to the top, sat there a while and then crawled into one of the crevices in the tree. I didn't see any blood or anything on it, and I am hoping it can still fly. It just seemed a little odd that it was out this early in the season.
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Messages in this topic (3)
2a.
Re: big brown bat
Posted by:
Mon Apr 6, 2009 11:27 am (PDT)

big brown batCrikey isn't that amazing how far they travel....animals and birds amaze me how they manage to avoid all the dangers on their migrations, well some of them do....thank goodness.
Thanks for the info xxxxxx
xxxxxx
----- Original Message -----
From:
To: gardening4funandwildlife@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Monday, April 06, 2009 7:04 PM
Subject: [gardening4funandwildlife] big brown bat

I do think now that it was probably the big brown bat as the naturalist at the nature center said they are the ones that hibernate here and are out already. Apparently the little brown bat heads about 100 miles south of here to hibernate and heads back here in May.
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2b.
Re: big brown bat
Posted by:
Mon Apr 6, 2009 1:23 pm (PDT)
Little Brown Bats are the most common species in the Midwest and they both migrate and hibernate. LB Bats are found in every state of the US and over wintering colonies are found in both Illinois and Iowa. I do believe they are found at Maquoketa Caves in Eastern Iowa.
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