View Single Post
Old 11-16-2014, 04:44 PM   #9
dapjwy
WG Hospitality & UAOKA recipient
 
dapjwy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Pennsylvania
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by kchd View Post
I took a class a few years ago from Oregon State: Ecology of Invasive Plants. One of the key take-home messages was that disturbance...If you can maintain a natural ecosystem and minimize or eliminate disturbance, you're ahead of the curve.
That is one reason I like the idea of smothering...perhaps I'm wrong, but it feels like there is less disturbance to the soil itself--not only the beneficial microorganisms and their various zones, but also exposing the seedbank (likely more invasive plants where I live as it has been developed/farmed for decades if not centuries).

I really hope that I am successful in reclaiming areas, then pretty much letting nature take its course (with the exception of several areas where I will try to prevent natural succession...my goal is to leave several areas in various stages of succession).

Once I move all of the rocks, and mini-boulders into place for my pond/streambed project, I hope to stop disturbing things that surely are utilizing the dry areas underneath. Creating landscapes that don't require continuous (man-made) disturbances seems to be the way to go.
__________________
"If suburbia were landscaped with meadows, prairies, thickets or forests, or combinations of these, then the water would sparkle, fish would be good to eat again, birds would sing and human spirits would soar." ~ Lorrie Otto
~ A Native Backyard Blog ~
dapjwy is offline   Reply With Quote